Clinical implications of antibiotic impact on gastrointestinal microbiota and Clostridium difficile infection

Sahil Khanna, Darrell S. Pardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The human gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota plays an important role in human health. Anaerobic bacteria prevalent in the normal colon suppress the growth of non-commensal microorganisms, thus maintaining colonic homeostasis. The GI microbiota is influenced by both patient-specific and environmental factors, particularly antibiotics. Antibiotics can alter the native GI microbiota composition, leading to decreased colonization resistance and opportunistic proliferation of non-native organisms. A common and potentially serious antibiotic-induced sequela associated with GI microbiota imbalance is Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), which may become recurrent if dysbiosis persists. This review focuses on the association between antibiotics and CDI, and the antibiotic-induced disruption leading to recurrent CDI. Promoting antibiotic stewardship is pivotal in protecting native microbiota and reducing the incidence of CDI and other GI infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalExpert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 17 2016

Fingerprint

Clostridium Infections
Clostridium difficile
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Dysbiosis
Anaerobic Bacteria
Microbiota
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Colon
Homeostasis
Incidence
Health
Growth
Infection

Keywords

  • antibiotic-associated diarrhea
  • antibiotics
  • Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea
  • Clostridium difficile infection
  • microbiome
  • microbiota
  • stewardship

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Clinical implications of antibiotic impact on gastrointestinal microbiota and Clostridium difficile infection. / Khanna, Sahil; Pardi, Darrell S.

In: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 17.03.2016, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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