Clinical impact and resource utilization after stem cell mobilization failure in patients with multiple myeloma and lymphoma

M. A. Gertz, R. C. Wolf, I. N.M. Micallef, D. A. Gastineau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

High-dose chemotherapy in conjunction with auto-SCT is the preferred treatment of relapsed Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma and newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Failure to achieve optimal stem cell mobilization results in multiple subsequent attempts, which consumes large amounts of growth factors and potentially requires antibiotics and transfusions. We retrospectively reviewed the natural history of stem cell mobilization attempts at our institution from 2001 to 2007 to determine the frequency of suboptimal mobilization in patients with hematologic malignancy undergoing autologous transplant and analyzed the subsequent resource utilization in patients with initially failed attempts. Of 1775 patients undergoing mobilization during the study period, stem cell collection (defined by the number of CD34 cells/kg) was optimal (5 × 10 6) in 53%, low (2-5 × 10 6) in 25%, poor (2 × 10 6) in 10%, and failed (10 CD34 cells/l) in 12%. In the 47% of collections that were less than optimal, increased resource consumption included increased use of growth factors and antibiotics, subsequent chemotherapy mobilization, increased transfusional support, more apheresis procedures, and more frequent hospitalization. This usually unappreciated resource utilization associated with stem cell mobilization failure highlights the need for more effective mobilization strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1396-1403
Number of pages8
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume45
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

Keywords

  • SCT
  • growth factors
  • stem cell mobilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

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