Client variance and scheduler uncertainty in dynamic appointment scheduling

Thomas R. Rohleder, Kenneth J. Klassen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study examines the effects of using continuous distribution for client service time variances in dynamic appointment scheduling. Previous research considered only a discrete variance distribution. The primary performance objective is to minimize the combined cost of client waiting and server idle time. The relaxed variance distribution assumption is particularly pertinent to the class of scheduling rules recently developed in Klassen and Rohleder, which use client service time variances. From [6], the low variance beginning (LVBEG) rule was selected as representative for this study. Additionally, scheduler uncertainty when classifying clients is added as an experimental factor. The results show LVBEG still performs well with the more realistic assumptions considered in this study. It is statistically the best rule for all levels of service time variance dispersion. Also, while greater scheduler uncertainty lessens LVBEG's effectiveness, even with the highest level of uncertainty, LVBEG was still better than any other scheduling rule tested in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Annual Meeting of the Decision Sciences Institute
Editors Anon
Place of PublicationAtlanta, GA, United States
PublisherDecis Sci Inst
Pages1621-1623
Number of pages3
Volume3
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1996 27th Annual Meeting of the Decision Sciences Institute. Part 2 (of 3) - Orlando, FL, USA
Duration: Nov 24 1996Nov 26 1996

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1996 27th Annual Meeting of the Decision Sciences Institute. Part 2 (of 3)
CityOrlando, FL, USA
Period11/24/9611/26/96

Fingerprint

Scheduling
Servers
Uncertainty
Appointment scheduling
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Information Systems
  • Hardware and Architecture

Cite this

Rohleder, T. R., & Klassen, K. J. (1996). Client variance and scheduler uncertainty in dynamic appointment scheduling. In Anon (Ed.), Proceedings - Annual Meeting of the Decision Sciences Institute (Vol. 3, pp. 1621-1623). Atlanta, GA, United States: Decis Sci Inst.

Client variance and scheduler uncertainty in dynamic appointment scheduling. / Rohleder, Thomas R.; Klassen, Kenneth J.

Proceedings - Annual Meeting of the Decision Sciences Institute. ed. / Anon. Vol. 3 Atlanta, GA, United States : Decis Sci Inst, 1996. p. 1621-1623.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Rohleder, TR & Klassen, KJ 1996, Client variance and scheduler uncertainty in dynamic appointment scheduling. in Anon (ed.), Proceedings - Annual Meeting of the Decision Sciences Institute. vol. 3, Decis Sci Inst, Atlanta, GA, United States, pp. 1621-1623, Proceedings of the 1996 27th Annual Meeting of the Decision Sciences Institute. Part 2 (of 3), Orlando, FL, USA, 11/24/96.
Rohleder TR, Klassen KJ. Client variance and scheduler uncertainty in dynamic appointment scheduling. In Anon, editor, Proceedings - Annual Meeting of the Decision Sciences Institute. Vol. 3. Atlanta, GA, United States: Decis Sci Inst. 1996. p. 1621-1623
Rohleder, Thomas R. ; Klassen, Kenneth J. / Client variance and scheduler uncertainty in dynamic appointment scheduling. Proceedings - Annual Meeting of the Decision Sciences Institute. editor / Anon. Vol. 3 Atlanta, GA, United States : Decis Sci Inst, 1996. pp. 1621-1623
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