Circulating levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 as a potential measure of biological age in mice and frailty in humans

Matthew J. Yousefzadeh, Marissa J. Schafer, Nicole Noren Hooten, Elizabeth J. Atkinson, Michele K. Evans, Darren J Baker, Ellen K. Quarles, Paul D. Robbins, Warren C. Ladiges, Nathan K LeBrasseur, Laura J. Niedernhofer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A serum biomarker of biological versus chronological age would have significant impact on clinical care. It could be used to identify individuals at risk of early-onset frailty or the multimorbidities associated with old age. It may also serve as a surrogate endpoint in clinical trials targeting mechanisms of aging. Here, we identified MCP-1/CCL2, a chemokine responsible for recruiting monocytes, as a potential biomarker of biological age. Circulating monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels increased in an age-dependent manner in wild-type (WT) mice. That age-dependent increase was accelerated in Ercc1-/Δ and Bubr1H/H mouse models of progeria. Genetic and pharmacologic interventions that slow aging of Ercc1-/Δ and WT mice lowered serum MCP-1 levels significantly. Finally, in elderly humans with aortic stenosis, MCP-1 levels were significantly higher in frail individuals compared to nonfrail. These data support the conclusion that MCP-1 can be used as a measure of mammalian biological age that is responsive to interventions that extend healthy aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAging Cell
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Chemokine CCL2
Biomarkers
Progeria
Genetic Engineering
Aortic Valve Stenosis
Comorbidity
Blood Proteins
Monocytes
Clinical Trials
Serum

Keywords

  • Biological age
  • Biomarkers of aging
  • CCL2
  • Chemokine
  • Geropathology
  • Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Yousefzadeh, M. J., Schafer, M. J., Noren Hooten, N., Atkinson, E. J., Evans, M. K., Baker, D. J., ... Niedernhofer, L. J. (Accepted/In press). Circulating levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 as a potential measure of biological age in mice and frailty in humans. Aging Cell. https://doi.org/10.1111/acel.12706

Circulating levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 as a potential measure of biological age in mice and frailty in humans. / Yousefzadeh, Matthew J.; Schafer, Marissa J.; Noren Hooten, Nicole; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Evans, Michele K.; Baker, Darren J; Quarles, Ellen K.; Robbins, Paul D.; Ladiges, Warren C.; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

In: Aging Cell, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yousefzadeh, MJ, Schafer, MJ, Noren Hooten, N, Atkinson, EJ, Evans, MK, Baker, DJ, Quarles, EK, Robbins, PD, Ladiges, WC, LeBrasseur, NK & Niedernhofer, LJ 2018, 'Circulating levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 as a potential measure of biological age in mice and frailty in humans', Aging Cell. https://doi.org/10.1111/acel.12706
Yousefzadeh, Matthew J. ; Schafer, Marissa J. ; Noren Hooten, Nicole ; Atkinson, Elizabeth J. ; Evans, Michele K. ; Baker, Darren J ; Quarles, Ellen K. ; Robbins, Paul D. ; Ladiges, Warren C. ; LeBrasseur, Nathan K ; Niedernhofer, Laura J. / Circulating levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 as a potential measure of biological age in mice and frailty in humans. In: Aging Cell. 2018.
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