Cigarette smoking and the risk for cartilage loss and knee pain in men with knee osteoarthritis

Shreyasee Amin, J. Niu, A. Guermazi, M. Grigoryan, D. J. Hunter, M. Clancy, M. P. LaValley, H. K. Genant, D. T. Felson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effects of smoking on cartilage loss and pain at the knee in individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: 159 men with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis who participated in a 30-month, prospective, natural history study of knee osteoarthritis were examined. The more symptomatic knee was imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline, and again at 15 and 30 months of follow-up. Cartilage was scored using the Whole-Organ MRI Score semiquantitative method at the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints and at the patellofemoral joint. At baseline and follow-up visits, the severity of knee pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale pain score (0-100 mm). Results: Among the 159 men, 19 (12%) were current smokers at baseline. Current smokers were younger (mean (standard deviation (SD)) age 62 (9) v 69 (9) years) and leaner (mean (SD) body mass index (BMI): 28.9 (3.2) v 31.3 (4.8) kg/m 2) than men who were not current smokers. When adjusted for age, BMI and baseline cartilage scores, men who were current smokers were found to have an increased risk for cartilage loss at the medial tibiofemoral joint (odds ratio (OR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0 to 5.4) and the patellofemoral joint (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 5.7). Current smokers also had higher adjusted pain scores at baseline (60.5 v 45.0, p<0.05) and at follow-up (59.4 v 44.3, p<0.05) than men who were not current smokers. Conclusions: Men with knee osteoarthritis who smoke sustain greater cartilage loss and have more severe knee pain than men who do not smoke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-22
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of the Rheumatic Diseases
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

Fingerprint

Knee Osteoarthritis
Cartilage
Tobacco Products
Knee
Smoking
Pain
Magnetic resonance
Patellofemoral Joint
Smoke
Imaging techniques
Body Mass Index
Joints
Odds Ratio
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Confidence Intervals
Pain Measurement
Natural History

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Cigarette smoking and the risk for cartilage loss and knee pain in men with knee osteoarthritis. / Amin, Shreyasee; Niu, J.; Guermazi, A.; Grigoryan, M.; Hunter, D. J.; Clancy, M.; LaValley, M. P.; Genant, H. K.; Felson, D. T.

In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, Vol. 66, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 18-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Amin, S, Niu, J, Guermazi, A, Grigoryan, M, Hunter, DJ, Clancy, M, LaValley, MP, Genant, HK & Felson, DT 2007, 'Cigarette smoking and the risk for cartilage loss and knee pain in men with knee osteoarthritis', Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol. 66, no. 1, pp. 18-22. https://doi.org/10.1136/ard.2006.056697
Amin, Shreyasee ; Niu, J. ; Guermazi, A. ; Grigoryan, M. ; Hunter, D. J. ; Clancy, M. ; LaValley, M. P. ; Genant, H. K. ; Felson, D. T. / Cigarette smoking and the risk for cartilage loss and knee pain in men with knee osteoarthritis. In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. 2007 ; Vol. 66, No. 1. pp. 18-22.
@article{6289204ef82e41abae3ac5d869cc610b,
title = "Cigarette smoking and the risk for cartilage loss and knee pain in men with knee osteoarthritis",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the effects of smoking on cartilage loss and pain at the knee in individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: 159 men with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis who participated in a 30-month, prospective, natural history study of knee osteoarthritis were examined. The more symptomatic knee was imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline, and again at 15 and 30 months of follow-up. Cartilage was scored using the Whole-Organ MRI Score semiquantitative method at the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints and at the patellofemoral joint. At baseline and follow-up visits, the severity of knee pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale pain score (0-100 mm). Results: Among the 159 men, 19 (12{\%}) were current smokers at baseline. Current smokers were younger (mean (standard deviation (SD)) age 62 (9) v 69 (9) years) and leaner (mean (SD) body mass index (BMI): 28.9 (3.2) v 31.3 (4.8) kg/m 2) than men who were not current smokers. When adjusted for age, BMI and baseline cartilage scores, men who were current smokers were found to have an increased risk for cartilage loss at the medial tibiofemoral joint (odds ratio (OR) 2.3, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.0 to 5.4) and the patellofemoral joint (OR 2.5, 95{\%} CI 1.1 to 5.7). Current smokers also had higher adjusted pain scores at baseline (60.5 v 45.0, p<0.05) and at follow-up (59.4 v 44.3, p<0.05) than men who were not current smokers. Conclusions: Men with knee osteoarthritis who smoke sustain greater cartilage loss and have more severe knee pain than men who do not smoke.",
author = "Shreyasee Amin and J. Niu and A. Guermazi and M. Grigoryan and Hunter, {D. J.} and M. Clancy and LaValley, {M. P.} and Genant, {H. K.} and Felson, {D. T.}",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1136/ard.2006.056697",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "66",
pages = "18--22",
journal = "Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases",
issn = "0003-4967",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cigarette smoking and the risk for cartilage loss and knee pain in men with knee osteoarthritis

AU - Amin, Shreyasee

AU - Niu, J.

AU - Guermazi, A.

AU - Grigoryan, M.

AU - Hunter, D. J.

AU - Clancy, M.

AU - LaValley, M. P.

AU - Genant, H. K.

AU - Felson, D. T.

PY - 2007/1

Y1 - 2007/1

N2 - Objective: To examine the effects of smoking on cartilage loss and pain at the knee in individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: 159 men with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis who participated in a 30-month, prospective, natural history study of knee osteoarthritis were examined. The more symptomatic knee was imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline, and again at 15 and 30 months of follow-up. Cartilage was scored using the Whole-Organ MRI Score semiquantitative method at the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints and at the patellofemoral joint. At baseline and follow-up visits, the severity of knee pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale pain score (0-100 mm). Results: Among the 159 men, 19 (12%) were current smokers at baseline. Current smokers were younger (mean (standard deviation (SD)) age 62 (9) v 69 (9) years) and leaner (mean (SD) body mass index (BMI): 28.9 (3.2) v 31.3 (4.8) kg/m 2) than men who were not current smokers. When adjusted for age, BMI and baseline cartilage scores, men who were current smokers were found to have an increased risk for cartilage loss at the medial tibiofemoral joint (odds ratio (OR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0 to 5.4) and the patellofemoral joint (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 5.7). Current smokers also had higher adjusted pain scores at baseline (60.5 v 45.0, p<0.05) and at follow-up (59.4 v 44.3, p<0.05) than men who were not current smokers. Conclusions: Men with knee osteoarthritis who smoke sustain greater cartilage loss and have more severe knee pain than men who do not smoke.

AB - Objective: To examine the effects of smoking on cartilage loss and pain at the knee in individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: 159 men with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis who participated in a 30-month, prospective, natural history study of knee osteoarthritis were examined. The more symptomatic knee was imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline, and again at 15 and 30 months of follow-up. Cartilage was scored using the Whole-Organ MRI Score semiquantitative method at the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints and at the patellofemoral joint. At baseline and follow-up visits, the severity of knee pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale pain score (0-100 mm). Results: Among the 159 men, 19 (12%) were current smokers at baseline. Current smokers were younger (mean (standard deviation (SD)) age 62 (9) v 69 (9) years) and leaner (mean (SD) body mass index (BMI): 28.9 (3.2) v 31.3 (4.8) kg/m 2) than men who were not current smokers. When adjusted for age, BMI and baseline cartilage scores, men who were current smokers were found to have an increased risk for cartilage loss at the medial tibiofemoral joint (odds ratio (OR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0 to 5.4) and the patellofemoral joint (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 5.7). Current smokers also had higher adjusted pain scores at baseline (60.5 v 45.0, p<0.05) and at follow-up (59.4 v 44.3, p<0.05) than men who were not current smokers. Conclusions: Men with knee osteoarthritis who smoke sustain greater cartilage loss and have more severe knee pain than men who do not smoke.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846028703&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846028703&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/ard.2006.056697

DO - 10.1136/ard.2006.056697

M3 - Article

C2 - 17158140

AN - SCOPUS:33846028703

VL - 66

SP - 18

EP - 22

JO - Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

JF - Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

SN - 0003-4967

IS - 1

ER -