Childhood abuse is associated with worse survival following lung transplantation

Cassie Kennedy, Adeel Zubair, Matthew M Clark, Sheila Jowsey-Gregoire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Psychosocial factors can impact lung transplant outcomes. However, it is currently unknown whether abuse survivorship influences lung transplant survival. Objective: To characterize the abuse history of adult lung transplant patients and determine whether such history is associated with mortality. Patients and Other Participants: Adult lung transplant recipients evaluated from 2000 to 2004. Main Outcome Measures: The main outcome was post-lung transplantation survival. The secondary outcomes included demographic, transplantation, or psychological assessment differences between those with a history of abuse survivorship and those without. Results: Thirty-three lung transplant recipients (35.5% male, median age: 55 years) were included. A history of abuse survivorship was common (24.2%) and was associated with decreased survival following lung transplantation (P =.003). There was no difference in sex, marital status, or smoking history between abuse survivors and those who denied being the victim of abuse. Abuse survivors had a higher Personality Assessment Screener total score, a measure of maladaptive personality traits (P =.02). Conclusion: Abuse survivorship is common in lung transplant patients and associated with increased posttransplant mortality and increased maladaptive personality traits. This preliminary evidence suggests that lung transplant patients should be screened for abuse history and provided with appropriate treatment of survivorship issues to potentially improve their health outcomes from transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)178-182
Number of pages5
JournalProgress in Transplantation
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Lung Transplantation
Lung
Survival
Survival Rate
Transplants
Personality
Survivors
Transplantation
History
Psychology
Personality Assessment
Mortality
Marital Status
Sex Characteristics
Smoking
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Health

Keywords

  • Adult survivors of child abuse
  • Lung transplant
  • Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Childhood abuse is associated with worse survival following lung transplantation. / Kennedy, Cassie; Zubair, Adeel; Clark, Matthew M; Jowsey-Gregoire, Sheila.

In: Progress in Transplantation, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.06.2016, p. 178-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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