Child Psychopathology Rating Scales and Interrater Agreement: II. Child and Family Characteristics

PETER S. JENSEN, STEPHEN N. XENAKIS, HARRY DAVIS, JAMES DEGROOT

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

One hundred families with a child from ages 6 to 11 from a nonclinical population were surveyed to determine the effects of child and family psychosocial and demographic characteristics on interrater agreement about children's symptoms and behavior problems. Results indicated that a significant proportion of the variance in difference scores among parent, child, and teacher reports about the child is a function of the family status (blended/previous divorce versus intact family), sex of parent and child, life stressors, the child's tendency to respond in socially desirable fashion, sibling position and family size, and familiarity of the child to the rater. Development of scales less sensitive to the effects of external, environmental, and child-related variables is needed to improve their reliability and validity and their usefulness as screening instruments in nonclinical populations. J. Am. Acad. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry, 1988, 27, 4:451–461.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)451-461
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

Keywords

  • family status
  • interrater agreement
  • rating scales
  • sibling position
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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