Child Psychopathology Rating Scales and Interrater Agreement: I. Parents' Gender and Psychiatric Symptoms

PETER S. JENSEN, JOHN TRAYLOR, STEPHEN N. XENAKIS, HARRY DAVIS

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

134 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although various parent-report and child self-report rating scales appear reliable and valid with child psychiatric inpatients, significant problems have been encountered with their use in outpatient and community samples. To assess possible gender and psychologic factors affecting correspondence of parents' and children's reports of children's symptoms, 100 children (45 girls, 55 boys) and their parents completed behavior problems scales. Results indicated that mothers rated sons and daughters significantly higher in symptoms than did fathers. Although interparent reliabilities were moderate for ratings of sons and daughters, parent-parent and parent-child agreement about reports of children's symptoms were significantly related to the parents' own levels of psychiatric symptoms, the gender of the child, and the type of parental symptoms. J. Am. Acad. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry, 1988, 27, 4:442–450.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-450
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

Keywords

  • child-reports
  • interrater agreement
  • parent-reports
  • rating scales

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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