Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: Prevention and treatment

D. R. Pachman, D. L. Barton, James Watson, Charles Lawrence Loprinzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

156 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common, dose-limiting side effect of many chemotherapeutic agents. Although many therapies have been investigated for the prevention and/or treatment of CIPN, there is no well-accepted proven therapy. In addition, there is no universally accepted, well-validated measure for the assessment of CIPN. The agents for which there are the strongest preliminary data regarding their potential efficacy in preventing CIPN are intravenous calcium and magnesium (Ca/Mg) infusions and glutathione. Agents with the strongest supporting evidence for efficacy in the treatment of CIPN include topical pain relievers, such as baclofen/amitriptyline/ketamine gel, and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, such as venlafaxine and duloxetine. Other promising therapies are also reviewed in this paper. Cutaneous electrostimulation is a nonpharmacological therapy that appears, from an early pilot trial, to be potentially effective in the treatment of CIPN. Finally, there is a lack of evidence of effective treatments for the paclitaxel acute pain syndrome (P-APS), which appears to be caused by neurologic injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-387
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume90
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

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Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics
Nervous System Trauma
Baclofen
Amitriptyline
Ketamine
Acute Pain
Paclitaxel
Magnesium
Glutathione
Gels
Calcium
Pain
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy : Prevention and treatment. / Pachman, D. R.; Barton, D. L.; Watson, James; Loprinzi, Charles Lawrence.

In: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 90, No. 3, 09.2011, p. 377-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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