Characterizing the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease and the prospect of presymptomatic intervention

Richard John Caselli, Eric M. Reiman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies of asymptomatic carriers of genes that are known to predispose to Alzheimer's disease (AD) have facilitated the characterization of preclinical AD. The most prevalent genetic risk factor is the ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APOE). Neuropathological studies of young deceased ε4 carriers have shown modest but abnormal amounts of neocortical amyloid and medial temporal neurofibrillary tangles that is also reflected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, amyloid-β, and phospho-tau in particular. MRI studies have shown progressive hippocampal and gray matter atrophy with the advent of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and fluorodeoxyglucose PET scans show reduced cerebral metabolism in posterior cingulate and related AD regions evident even in 30 year olds. Cerebral amyloidosis disclosed by more recent amyloid ligand PET studies in asymptomatic 60 year olds increases in parallel with ε4 gene dose. Longitudinal neuropsychological studies have revealed accelerated memory decline in ε4 carriers beginning around age 55-60 years whose severity again parallels ε4 gene dose. The clinico-pathological correlation of declining memory and AD-like neuropathological change defines preclinical AD and has set the stage for the accelerated evaluation of presymptomatic AD treatments. In this article, we briefly consider some of the earliest detectable changes associated with the predisposition to AD, and some of the prevention trial strategies that have been proposed to help find treatments to reduce the risk, postpone the onset of, or completely prevent AD symptoms as soon as possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume33
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Alzheimer Disease
Amyloid
Genes
Apolipoprotein E4
Asymptomatic Diseases
Neurofibrillary Tangles
Gyrus Cinguli
Positron-Emission Tomography
Atrophy
Longitudinal Studies
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Biomarkers
Alleles
Ligands

Keywords

  • APOE
  • normal aging
  • preclinical
  • prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Characterizing the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease and the prospect of presymptomatic intervention. / Caselli, Richard John; Reiman, Eric M.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 33, No. SUPPL. 1, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c46bd2f46a0345c6a20d1e1f2a5366f0,
title = "Characterizing the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease and the prospect of presymptomatic intervention",
abstract = "Studies of asymptomatic carriers of genes that are known to predispose to Alzheimer's disease (AD) have facilitated the characterization of preclinical AD. The most prevalent genetic risk factor is the ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APOE). Neuropathological studies of young deceased ε4 carriers have shown modest but abnormal amounts of neocortical amyloid and medial temporal neurofibrillary tangles that is also reflected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, amyloid-β, and phospho-tau in particular. MRI studies have shown progressive hippocampal and gray matter atrophy with the advent of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and fluorodeoxyglucose PET scans show reduced cerebral metabolism in posterior cingulate and related AD regions evident even in 30 year olds. Cerebral amyloidosis disclosed by more recent amyloid ligand PET studies in asymptomatic 60 year olds increases in parallel with ε4 gene dose. Longitudinal neuropsychological studies have revealed accelerated memory decline in ε4 carriers beginning around age 55-60 years whose severity again parallels ε4 gene dose. The clinico-pathological correlation of declining memory and AD-like neuropathological change defines preclinical AD and has set the stage for the accelerated evaluation of presymptomatic AD treatments. In this article, we briefly consider some of the earliest detectable changes associated with the predisposition to AD, and some of the prevention trial strategies that have been proposed to help find treatments to reduce the risk, postpone the onset of, or completely prevent AD symptoms as soon as possible.",
keywords = "APOE, normal aging, preclinical, prevention",
author = "Caselli, {Richard John} and Reiman, {Eric M.}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.3233/JAD-2012-129026",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
journal = "Journal of Alzheimer's Disease",
issn = "1387-2877",
publisher = "IOS Press",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterizing the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease and the prospect of presymptomatic intervention

AU - Caselli, Richard John

AU - Reiman, Eric M.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Studies of asymptomatic carriers of genes that are known to predispose to Alzheimer's disease (AD) have facilitated the characterization of preclinical AD. The most prevalent genetic risk factor is the ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APOE). Neuropathological studies of young deceased ε4 carriers have shown modest but abnormal amounts of neocortical amyloid and medial temporal neurofibrillary tangles that is also reflected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, amyloid-β, and phospho-tau in particular. MRI studies have shown progressive hippocampal and gray matter atrophy with the advent of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and fluorodeoxyglucose PET scans show reduced cerebral metabolism in posterior cingulate and related AD regions evident even in 30 year olds. Cerebral amyloidosis disclosed by more recent amyloid ligand PET studies in asymptomatic 60 year olds increases in parallel with ε4 gene dose. Longitudinal neuropsychological studies have revealed accelerated memory decline in ε4 carriers beginning around age 55-60 years whose severity again parallels ε4 gene dose. The clinico-pathological correlation of declining memory and AD-like neuropathological change defines preclinical AD and has set the stage for the accelerated evaluation of presymptomatic AD treatments. In this article, we briefly consider some of the earliest detectable changes associated with the predisposition to AD, and some of the prevention trial strategies that have been proposed to help find treatments to reduce the risk, postpone the onset of, or completely prevent AD symptoms as soon as possible.

AB - Studies of asymptomatic carriers of genes that are known to predispose to Alzheimer's disease (AD) have facilitated the characterization of preclinical AD. The most prevalent genetic risk factor is the ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APOE). Neuropathological studies of young deceased ε4 carriers have shown modest but abnormal amounts of neocortical amyloid and medial temporal neurofibrillary tangles that is also reflected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, amyloid-β, and phospho-tau in particular. MRI studies have shown progressive hippocampal and gray matter atrophy with the advent of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and fluorodeoxyglucose PET scans show reduced cerebral metabolism in posterior cingulate and related AD regions evident even in 30 year olds. Cerebral amyloidosis disclosed by more recent amyloid ligand PET studies in asymptomatic 60 year olds increases in parallel with ε4 gene dose. Longitudinal neuropsychological studies have revealed accelerated memory decline in ε4 carriers beginning around age 55-60 years whose severity again parallels ε4 gene dose. The clinico-pathological correlation of declining memory and AD-like neuropathological change defines preclinical AD and has set the stage for the accelerated evaluation of presymptomatic AD treatments. In this article, we briefly consider some of the earliest detectable changes associated with the predisposition to AD, and some of the prevention trial strategies that have been proposed to help find treatments to reduce the risk, postpone the onset of, or completely prevent AD symptoms as soon as possible.

KW - APOE

KW - normal aging

KW - preclinical

KW - prevention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84872584059&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84872584059&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3233/JAD-2012-129026

DO - 10.3233/JAD-2012-129026

M3 - Article

C2 - 22695623

AN - SCOPUS:84872584059

VL - 33

JO - Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

JF - Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

SN - 1387-2877

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -