Characteristics of children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis

the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers, Moses Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United States. METHODS: This prospective observational study included children and adolescents with MS. Cases were evaluated across 9 geographically diverse sites as part of the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers. RESULTS: A total of 490 children and adolescents (324 girls, 166 boys) were enrolled; 28% developed symptoms before 12 years of age. The proportion of girls increased with age from 58% (<12 years) to 70% (≥12 years). Race and ethnicity as self-identified were: white, 67%; African American, 21%; and non-Hispanic, 70%. Most (94%) of the cases were born in the United States, and 39% had 1 or both foreign-born parents. Fifty-five percent of cases had a monofocal presentation; 31% had a prodrome (most frequently infectious), most often among those aged <12 years (P < .001). Children aged <12 years presented more commonly with encephalopathy and coordination problems (P < .001). Sensory symptoms were more frequently reported by older children (ie, those aged =12 years) (P < .001); 78% of girls had MS onset postmenarche. The initial Expanded Disability Status Scale score for the group was <3.0, and the annualized relapse rate was 0.647 for the first 2 years. Interval from symptom onset to diagnosis and from diagnosis to initiation of disease-modifying therapy was longer among those <12 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric MS in the United States is characterized by racial and ethnic diversity, a high proportion of children with foreign-born parents, and differences in clinical features and timing of treatment among those <12 years of age compared with older children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20160120
JournalPediatrics
Volume138
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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Multiple Sclerosis
Pediatrics
Parents
Brain Diseases
African Americans
Observational Studies
Demography
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Therapeutics
Onset
Proportion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers, & Rodriguez, M. (2016). Characteristics of children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis. Pediatrics, 138(1), [e20160120]. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-0120

Characteristics of children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis. / the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers; Rodriguez, Moses.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 138, No. 1, e20160120, 01.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers & Rodriguez, M 2016, 'Characteristics of children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis', Pediatrics, vol. 138, no. 1, e20160120. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-0120
the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers, Rodriguez M. Characteristics of children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis. Pediatrics. 2016 Jul 1;138(1). e20160120. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-0120
the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers ; Rodriguez, Moses. / Characteristics of children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis. In: Pediatrics. 2016 ; Vol. 138, No. 1.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United States. METHODS: This prospective observational study included children and adolescents with MS. Cases were evaluated across 9 geographically diverse sites as part of the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers. RESULTS: A total of 490 children and adolescents (324 girls, 166 boys) were enrolled; 28{\%} developed symptoms before 12 years of age. The proportion of girls increased with age from 58{\%} (<12 years) to 70{\%} (≥12 years). Race and ethnicity as self-identified were: white, 67{\%}; African American, 21{\%}; and non-Hispanic, 70{\%}. Most (94{\%}) of the cases were born in the United States, and 39{\%} had 1 or both foreign-born parents. Fifty-five percent of cases had a monofocal presentation; 31{\%} had a prodrome (most frequently infectious), most often among those aged <12 years (P < .001). Children aged <12 years presented more commonly with encephalopathy and coordination problems (P < .001). Sensory symptoms were more frequently reported by older children (ie, those aged =12 years) (P < .001); 78{\%} of girls had MS onset postmenarche. The initial Expanded Disability Status Scale score for the group was <3.0, and the annualized relapse rate was 0.647 for the first 2 years. Interval from symptom onset to diagnosis and from diagnosis to initiation of disease-modifying therapy was longer among those <12 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric MS in the United States is characterized by racial and ethnic diversity, a high proportion of children with foreign-born parents, and differences in clinical features and timing of treatment among those <12 years of age compared with older children.",
author = "{the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers} and Belman, {Anita L.} and Krupp, {Lauren B.} and Olsen, {Cody S.} and Rose, {John W.} and Greg Aaen and Leslie Benson and Tanuja Chitnis and Mark Gorman and Jennifer Graves and Yolander Harris and Tim Lotze and Moses Rodriguez and Moses Rodriguez and Jan-Mendelt Tillema and Emmanuelle Waubant and Bianca Weinstock-Guttman and Casper, {T. Charles}",
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AU - the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers

AU - Belman, Anita L.

AU - Krupp, Lauren B.

AU - Olsen, Cody S.

AU - Rose, John W.

AU - Aaen, Greg

AU - Benson, Leslie

AU - Chitnis, Tanuja

AU - Gorman, Mark

AU - Graves, Jennifer

AU - Harris, Yolander

AU - Lotze, Tim

AU - Rodriguez, Moses

AU - Rodriguez, Moses

AU - Tillema, Jan-Mendelt

AU - Waubant, Emmanuelle

AU - Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

AU - Casper, T. Charles

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United States. METHODS: This prospective observational study included children and adolescents with MS. Cases were evaluated across 9 geographically diverse sites as part of the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers. RESULTS: A total of 490 children and adolescents (324 girls, 166 boys) were enrolled; 28% developed symptoms before 12 years of age. The proportion of girls increased with age from 58% (<12 years) to 70% (≥12 years). Race and ethnicity as self-identified were: white, 67%; African American, 21%; and non-Hispanic, 70%. Most (94%) of the cases were born in the United States, and 39% had 1 or both foreign-born parents. Fifty-five percent of cases had a monofocal presentation; 31% had a prodrome (most frequently infectious), most often among those aged <12 years (P < .001). Children aged <12 years presented more commonly with encephalopathy and coordination problems (P < .001). Sensory symptoms were more frequently reported by older children (ie, those aged =12 years) (P < .001); 78% of girls had MS onset postmenarche. The initial Expanded Disability Status Scale score for the group was <3.0, and the annualized relapse rate was 0.647 for the first 2 years. Interval from symptom onset to diagnosis and from diagnosis to initiation of disease-modifying therapy was longer among those <12 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric MS in the United States is characterized by racial and ethnic diversity, a high proportion of children with foreign-born parents, and differences in clinical features and timing of treatment among those <12 years of age compared with older children.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United States. METHODS: This prospective observational study included children and adolescents with MS. Cases were evaluated across 9 geographically diverse sites as part of the US Network of Pediatric MS Centers. RESULTS: A total of 490 children and adolescents (324 girls, 166 boys) were enrolled; 28% developed symptoms before 12 years of age. The proportion of girls increased with age from 58% (<12 years) to 70% (≥12 years). Race and ethnicity as self-identified were: white, 67%; African American, 21%; and non-Hispanic, 70%. Most (94%) of the cases were born in the United States, and 39% had 1 or both foreign-born parents. Fifty-five percent of cases had a monofocal presentation; 31% had a prodrome (most frequently infectious), most often among those aged <12 years (P < .001). Children aged <12 years presented more commonly with encephalopathy and coordination problems (P < .001). Sensory symptoms were more frequently reported by older children (ie, those aged =12 years) (P < .001); 78% of girls had MS onset postmenarche. The initial Expanded Disability Status Scale score for the group was <3.0, and the annualized relapse rate was 0.647 for the first 2 years. Interval from symptom onset to diagnosis and from diagnosis to initiation of disease-modifying therapy was longer among those <12 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric MS in the United States is characterized by racial and ethnic diversity, a high proportion of children with foreign-born parents, and differences in clinical features and timing of treatment among those <12 years of age compared with older children.

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