Changes in physical activity barriers among American Indian elders: A pilot study

Craig Sawchuk, Joan E. Russo, Peter Roy-Byrne, Jack Goldberg, Ralph Forquera, Dedra Buchwald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to assess whether selfreported physical activity barriers could be reduced among American Indian elders who participated in a 6-week randomized physical activity trial that compared the use of a pedometer only to that of pedometers with step-count goal setting. Elders (N = 32) were compared on the Barriers to Being Physically Active Quiz after participating in a pilot physical activity trial. Elders were classified into high- and low-barrier groups at baseline and compared on self-reported physical activity, health-related quality of life, pedometer step counts, and 6-minute walk performance. At the conclusion of the 6-week trial, only the lack of willpower subscale significantly decreased. The low-barrier group reported significantly higher physical activity engagement and improved mental health quality of life than the high-barrier group. The groups did not differ on daily step counts or 6-minute walk performance. Additional research is needed with a larger sample to understand relevant activity barriers in this population and assess whether they can be modified through participation in structured physical activity and exercise programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-140
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Architectural Accessibility
North American Indians
American Indian
Exercise
quality of life
Group
Quality of Life
quiz
Elders
Physical Activity
American Indians
performance
Mental Health
mental health
participation
lack
health
Research
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Anthropology
  • History
  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Changes in physical activity barriers among American Indian elders : A pilot study. / Sawchuk, Craig; Russo, Joan E.; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Goldberg, Jack; Forquera, Ralph; Buchwald, Dedra.

In: American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 127-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sawchuk, Craig ; Russo, Joan E. ; Roy-Byrne, Peter ; Goldberg, Jack ; Forquera, Ralph ; Buchwald, Dedra. / Changes in physical activity barriers among American Indian elders : A pilot study. In: American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research. 2017 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 127-140.
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