Changes in eating self-efficacy and body image following cognitive-behavioral group therapy for binge eating disorder: A clinical study

Gretchen E. Wolff, Matthew M. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Binge eating disorder (BED) is a frequent and significant psychiatric comorbidity among individuals seeking treatment for obesity. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is frequently recommended for the treatment of obese individuals with BED. However, there is limited investigation into the effectiveness of the specific components of CBT. In this study, we examine the impact of CBT for BED in obese women on self-efficacy for eating behavior and body image issues. Participants were 12 obese women who participated in a 15-week CBT group program. As predicted, results indicated a reduction in binge episode frequency and significant improvements in self-efficacy and body image pre- and posttreatment. These findings support the premise that a structured cognitive-behavioral group treatment program for obese individuals with BED will promote changes in self-efficacy and body image.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-104
Number of pages8
JournalEating Behaviors
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2001

Keywords

  • Binge eating
  • Body image disturbance
  • Self-efficacy
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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