Changes in colonic motility and the electrophysiological properties of myenteric neurons persist following recovery from trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid colitis in the guinea pig

E. M. Krauter, D. S. Strong, E. M. Brooks, D. R. Linden, K. A. Sharkey, G. M. Mawe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Persistent changes in gastrointestinal motility frequently accompany the resolution of colitis, through mechanisms that remain to be determined. Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis in the guinea pig decreases the rate of propulsive motility, causes hyperexcitability of AH neurons, and induces synaptic facilitation. The changes in motility and AH neurons are sensitive to cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition. The aim of this investigation was to determine if the motility and neurophysiological changes persist following recovery from colitis. Evaluations of inflammation, colonic motility and intracellular electrophysiology of myenteric neurons 8 weeks after TNBS administration were performed and compared to matched control conditions. Myeloperoxidase levels in the colons were comparable to control levels 56 days after TNBS treatment. At this time point, the rate of colonic motility was decreased relative to controls following treatment with TNBS alone or TNBS plus a COX-2 inhibitor. Furthermore, the electrical properties of AH neurons and fast synaptic potentials in S neurons were significantly different from controls and comparable to those detected during active inflammation. Collectively, these data suggest that altered myenteric neurophysiology initiated during active colitis persists long term, and provide a potential mechanism underlying altered gut function in individuals during remission from inflammatory bowel disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)990-1000
Number of pages11
JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume19
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Keywords

  • AH neurons
  • Enteric nervous system
  • Inflammatory bowel diseases
  • Intestinal motility
  • Postinflammatory
  • S neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Gastroenterology

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