Change in perceived stress, partner support, decisional balance, and self-efficacy following residential nicotine dependence treatment

Steven C. Ames, Ivana T. Croghan, Matthew M. Clark, Christi A. Patten, Susanna R. Stevens, Darrell R. Schroeder, Kay M. Eberman, J. Taylor Hays, Richard D. Hurt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The primary aim was to examine the effect of an eight day residential treatment for nicotine dependence on perceived stress, partner support, decisional balance, and self-efficacy for stopping smoking. Whether these variables predicted six months post treatment abstinence following residential treatment was also examined. Participants included 170 adult cigarette smokers. Perceived stress, partner support, decisional balance, and self-efficacy for stopping smoking were assessed on the first and last day of treatment. In addition, six month continuous tobacco abstinence was evaluated. Residential treatment was found to produce significant (p 0.001) treatment changes in all psychosocial factors except one aspect of decisional balance (i.e., cons of smoking). Psychosocial factors did not predict six month tobacco abstinence. Only age (p = 0.014) and history of mental illness (p = 0.012) were found to predict six month continuous abstinence following residential treatment. This study provides new information about how residential treatment impacts psychosocial factors considered to be important predictors of tobacco abstinence in outpatient settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-82
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Addictive Diseases
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 27 2008

Keywords

  • Intervention
  • Nicotine
  • Residential treatment
  • Tobacco cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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