Challenges in using electronic health record data for CER: Experience of 4 learning organizations and solutions applied

K. Bruce Bayley, Tom Belnap, Lucy Savitz, Andrew L. Masica, Nilay D Shah, Neil S. Fleming

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To document the strengths and challenges of using electronic health records (EHRs) for comparative effectiveness research (CER). METHODS: A replicated case study of comparative effectiveness in hypertension treatment was conducted across 4 health systems, with instructions to extract data and document problems encountered using a specified list of required data elements. Researchers at each health system documented successes and challenges, and suggested solutions for addressing challenges. RESULTS: Data challenges fell into 5 categories: missing data, erroneous data, uninterpretable data, inconsistencies among providers and over time, and data stored in noncoded text notes. Suggested strategies to address these issues include data validation steps, use of surrogate markers, natural language processing, and statistical techniques. DISCUSSION: A number of EHR issues can hamper the extraction of valid data for cross-health system comparative effectiveness studies. Our case example cautions against a blind reliance on EHR data as a single definitive data source. Nevertheless, EHR data are superior to administrative or claims data alone, and are cheaper and timelier than clinical trials or manual chart reviews. All 4 participating health systems are pursuing pathways to more effectively use EHR data for CER.A partnership between clinicians, researchers, and information technology specialists is encouraged as a way to capitalize on the wealth of information contained in the EHR. Future developments in both technology and care delivery hold promise for improvement in the ability to use EHR data for CER.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMedical Care
Volume51
Issue number8 SUPPL.3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Fingerprint

Comparative Effectiveness Research
Electronic Health Records
Learning
Organizations
Health
Research Personnel
Natural Language Processing
Technology
Aptitude
Information Services
Information Storage and Retrieval
Biomarkers
Clinical Trials
Hypertension

Keywords

  • comparative effectiveness
  • data quality
  • electronic health records

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Challenges in using electronic health record data for CER : Experience of 4 learning organizations and solutions applied. / Bayley, K. Bruce; Belnap, Tom; Savitz, Lucy; Masica, Andrew L.; Shah, Nilay D; Fleming, Neil S.

In: Medical Care, Vol. 51, No. 8 SUPPL.3, 08.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bayley, K. Bruce ; Belnap, Tom ; Savitz, Lucy ; Masica, Andrew L. ; Shah, Nilay D ; Fleming, Neil S. / Challenges in using electronic health record data for CER : Experience of 4 learning organizations and solutions applied. In: Medical Care. 2013 ; Vol. 51, No. 8 SUPPL.3.
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