CGRP ligand and receptor monoclonal antibodies for migraine prevention

Evidence review and clinical implications

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Monoclonal antibodies that target calcitonin gene-related peptide or the canonical calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor have emerged as effective and well tolerated for the preventive treatment of migraine. These large molecules appear ideally suited for migraine prevention. They have an extended biological half-life, are administered either monthly or quarterly either by subcutaneous injection or intravenous infusion, require minimal or no dose-titration and have the potential for a rapid onset of effect compared to conventional oral preventive drugs. There is high selectivity and they target an important mediator in the pathogenesis of migraine. Investigation: Phase II and pivotal phase III studies have all yielded positive results with a favorable adverse event profile. No serious treatment-related adverse outcomes have thus far been reported in controlled or long-term open-label extension studies. This tolerability profile promises to improve adherence and, possibly, long-term outcomes. Conclusions: Calcitonin gene-related peptide monoclonal antibodies are effective and well tolerated for the preventive treatment of migraine. They have distinct advantages over currently available oral preventive drugs. While treatment-related serious adverse events have not been observed in open-label extension studies, long-term outcomes and safety will require broad exposure in heterogeneous patient populations in clinical practice. In addition, their safety in women, especially during pregnancy, will require longitudinal surveillance. Given the overlapping mechanism(s), the effectiveness of existing (triptans) and emerging (calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists) acute therapies in those using a calcitonin gene-related peptide mAb will require further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCephalalgia
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Receptors
Migraine Disorders
Monoclonal Antibodies
Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide
Ligands
Tryptamines
Therapeutics
Safety
Subcutaneous Infusions
Subcutaneous Injections
Intravenous Infusions
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Half-Life
Pregnancy
Population

Keywords

  • CGRP
  • mAbs
  • migraine prevention
  • monoclonal antibody

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "CGRP ligand and receptor monoclonal antibodies for migraine prevention: Evidence review and clinical implications",
abstract = "Background: Monoclonal antibodies that target calcitonin gene-related peptide or the canonical calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor have emerged as effective and well tolerated for the preventive treatment of migraine. These large molecules appear ideally suited for migraine prevention. They have an extended biological half-life, are administered either monthly or quarterly either by subcutaneous injection or intravenous infusion, require minimal or no dose-titration and have the potential for a rapid onset of effect compared to conventional oral preventive drugs. There is high selectivity and they target an important mediator in the pathogenesis of migraine. Investigation: Phase II and pivotal phase III studies have all yielded positive results with a favorable adverse event profile. No serious treatment-related adverse outcomes have thus far been reported in controlled or long-term open-label extension studies. This tolerability profile promises to improve adherence and, possibly, long-term outcomes. Conclusions: Calcitonin gene-related peptide monoclonal antibodies are effective and well tolerated for the preventive treatment of migraine. They have distinct advantages over currently available oral preventive drugs. While treatment-related serious adverse events have not been observed in open-label extension studies, long-term outcomes and safety will require broad exposure in heterogeneous patient populations in clinical practice. In addition, their safety in women, especially during pregnancy, will require longitudinal surveillance. Given the overlapping mechanism(s), the effectiveness of existing (triptans) and emerging (calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists) acute therapies in those using a calcitonin gene-related peptide mAb will require further study.",
keywords = "CGRP, mAbs, migraine prevention, monoclonal antibody",
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language = "English (US)",
journal = "Cephalalgia",
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AB - Background: Monoclonal antibodies that target calcitonin gene-related peptide or the canonical calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor have emerged as effective and well tolerated for the preventive treatment of migraine. These large molecules appear ideally suited for migraine prevention. They have an extended biological half-life, are administered either monthly or quarterly either by subcutaneous injection or intravenous infusion, require minimal or no dose-titration and have the potential for a rapid onset of effect compared to conventional oral preventive drugs. There is high selectivity and they target an important mediator in the pathogenesis of migraine. Investigation: Phase II and pivotal phase III studies have all yielded positive results with a favorable adverse event profile. No serious treatment-related adverse outcomes have thus far been reported in controlled or long-term open-label extension studies. This tolerability profile promises to improve adherence and, possibly, long-term outcomes. Conclusions: Calcitonin gene-related peptide monoclonal antibodies are effective and well tolerated for the preventive treatment of migraine. They have distinct advantages over currently available oral preventive drugs. While treatment-related serious adverse events have not been observed in open-label extension studies, long-term outcomes and safety will require broad exposure in heterogeneous patient populations in clinical practice. In addition, their safety in women, especially during pregnancy, will require longitudinal surveillance. Given the overlapping mechanism(s), the effectiveness of existing (triptans) and emerging (calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists) acute therapies in those using a calcitonin gene-related peptide mAb will require further study.

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