Central nervous system infections in heart transplant recipients

Diederik Van De Beek, Robin Patel, Richard C. Daly, Christopher G A McGregor, Eelco F M Wijdicks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To study central nervous system infections after heart transplantations. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: Cardiac Transplant Program at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Patients: Three hundred fifteen consecutive patients who underwent heart transplantation from January 1988 through June 2006. Results: Central nervous system infections developed in 8 patients (3%), all of whom presented within the first 4 years after transplantation. The most common presentations were acute or subacute confusion or headache (88%), often without the classic symptoms of fever and neck stiffness. Direct cerebrospinal fluid examination was unrevealing in most cases, though cerebrospinal fluid protein levels were elevated in all patients with infections. Diagnoses included cryptococcal meningitis (n=3), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (n=2), varicellazoster virus encephalitis (n=2), and Aspergillus fumigatus infection (n=1). Three of 8 patients died (38%) and 2 (25%) survived with mild sequelae. Central nervous system infection was a significant predictor of mortality (hazard ratio, 4.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.72-11.18; P=.002). Conclusions: Central nervous system infections are rare but devastating complications of heart transplantations. Recognition of these infections is difficult owing to a paucity of clinical manifestations. We report here, for the first time, varicella-zoster virus central nervous system infection in heart transplantations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1715-1720
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume64
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

Fingerprint

Central Nervous System Infections
Heart Transplantation
Infection
Encephalitis Viruses
Cryptococcal Meningitis
Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy
Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins
Human Herpesvirus 3
Aspergillus fumigatus
Headache
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Cohort Studies
Fever
Neck
Retrospective Studies
Transplantation
Transplant Recipients
Central Nervous System
Recipient
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Van De Beek, D., Patel, R., Daly, R. C., McGregor, C. G. A., & Wijdicks, E. F. M. (2007). Central nervous system infections in heart transplant recipients. Archives of Neurology, 64(12), 1715-1720. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneur.64.12.noc70065

Central nervous system infections in heart transplant recipients. / Van De Beek, Diederik; Patel, Robin; Daly, Richard C.; McGregor, Christopher G A; Wijdicks, Eelco F M.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 64, No. 12, 12.2007, p. 1715-1720.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Van De Beek, D, Patel, R, Daly, RC, McGregor, CGA & Wijdicks, EFM 2007, 'Central nervous system infections in heart transplant recipients', Archives of Neurology, vol. 64, no. 12, pp. 1715-1720. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneur.64.12.noc70065
Van De Beek, Diederik ; Patel, Robin ; Daly, Richard C. ; McGregor, Christopher G A ; Wijdicks, Eelco F M. / Central nervous system infections in heart transplant recipients. In: Archives of Neurology. 2007 ; Vol. 64, No. 12. pp. 1715-1720.
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