Central innervation of neurones in the inferior mesenteric ganglion and of the large intestine of the cat

J. Krier, P. F. Schmalz, J. H. Szurszewski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Segmental, lumbar sympathetic outflow to neurones in the cat inferior mesenteric ganglion and to the large intestine were studied. Synaptic responses of neurones in the inferior mesenteric ganglion were recorded intracellularly, in vitro, during electrical stimulation of preganglionic fibres in the lumbar white rami. Synaptic responses consisted of excitatory post-synaptic potentials and/or action potentials. None of the neurones tested received synaptic input from spinal cord segment L1. There was synaptic input from segments L2-L5 of the spinal cord. The strongest synaptic input arose from spinal cord segments L3 and L4. 42% of the neurones tested received synaptic input from only one spinal cord segment. 54% of the neurones tested received convergent synaptic input from two, three or four adjacent lumbar segments. Electrophysiological measurements indicated that the number of preganglionic fibres in any lumbar white ramus communicans which provided synaptic input ranged from one to thirteen. Each lumbar white ramus contained, on average, five preganglionic fibres which provided synaptic input to neurones in the inferior mesenteric ganglion. Changes in intraluminal colonic pressure were measured in vivo during electrical stimulation of preganglionic fibres in the different lumbar white rami and lumbar ventral roots. Electrical stimulation of white rami L3 and L4 abolished phasic changes in intraluminal colonic pressure and reduced basal pressure to near zero. Electrical stimulation of preganglionic fibres in lumbar ventral roots L3 and L4 abolished phasic changes in intraluminal colonic pressure and reduced basal pressure to near zero. Stimulation of ventral roots, L1, L2 and L5 had little to no effect on intraluminal pressure. Based on the data obtained in this study, two hypotheses are proposed. First, spinal cord segments L3, L4 and L5 are the primary sources of central synaptic input to neurones in the inferior mesenteric ganglion. Secondly, spinal cord segments L3 and L4 control colonic motility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-138
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Physiology
VolumeVol. 332
StatePublished - 1982

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Large Intestine
Ganglia
Cats
Spinal Cord
Neurons
Pressure
Electric Stimulation
Spinal Nerve Roots
Synaptic Potentials
Action Potentials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Central innervation of neurones in the inferior mesenteric ganglion and of the large intestine of the cat. / Krier, J.; Schmalz, P. F.; Szurszewski, J. H.

In: Journal of Physiology, Vol. Vol. 332, 1982, p. 125-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krier, J. ; Schmalz, P. F. ; Szurszewski, J. H. / Central innervation of neurones in the inferior mesenteric ganglion and of the large intestine of the cat. In: Journal of Physiology. 1982 ; Vol. Vol. 332. pp. 125-138.
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