Centennial dissertation. Radiologic evaluation of soft-tissue masses

A current perspective

M. J. Kransdorf, M. D. Murphey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

140 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

MR imaging is the preferred modality for the evaluation of a soft-tissue mass after radiography. The radiologic appearance of certain soft-tissue tumors or tumorlike processes, such as myositis ossificans, fatty tumors, hemangiomas, peripheral nerve sheath tumors, pigmented villonodular synovitis, and certain hematomas may be sufficiently unique to allow a strong presumptive radiologic diagnosis. It must be emphasized that MR imaging cannot reliably distinguish between benign and malignant lesions and when radiologic evaluation is nonspecific, one is ill-advised to suggest that a lesion is benign or malignant solely on its MR imaging appearance. When a specific diagnosis is not possible, knowledge of tumor prevalence by location and age, with appropriate clinical history and radiologic features, can be used to establish a suitably ordered differential diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)575-587
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume175
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000

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Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis
Myositis Ossificans
Nerve Sheath Neoplasms
Lipoma
Hemangioma
Radiography
Hematoma
Neoplasms
Differential Diagnosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Centennial dissertation. Radiologic evaluation of soft-tissue masses : A current perspective. / Kransdorf, M. J.; Murphey, M. D.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 175, No. 3, 2000, p. 575-587.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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