Cellular senescence in aging and age-related disease

From mechanisms to therapy

Bennett G. Childs, Matej Durik, Darren J Baker, Jan Van Deursen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

362 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cellular senescence, a process that imposes permanent proliferative arrest on cells in response to various stressors, has emerged as a potentially important contributor to aging and age-related disease, and it is an attractive target for therapeutic exploitation. A wealth of information about senescence in cultured cells has been acquired over the past half century; however, senescence in living organisms is poorly understood, largely because of technical limitations relating to the identification and characterization of senescent cells in tissues and organs. Furthermore, newly recognized beneficial signaling functions of senescence suggest that indiscriminately targeting senescent cells or modulating their secretome for anti-aging therapy may have negative consequences. Here we discuss current progress and challenges in understanding the stressors that induce senescence in vivo, the cell types that are prone to senesce, and the autocrine and paracrine properties of senescent cells in the contexts of aging and age-related diseases as well as disease therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1424-1435
Number of pages12
JournalNature Medicine
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 8 2015

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Cell Aging
Aging of materials
Therapeutics
Cells
Tissue
Cultured Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cellular senescence in aging and age-related disease : From mechanisms to therapy. / Childs, Bennett G.; Durik, Matej; Baker, Darren J; Van Deursen, Jan.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 12, 08.12.2015, p. 1424-1435.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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