Cellular immune mechanisms in inflammatory myopathies

Reinhard Hohlfeld, Andrew G Engel, Norbert Goebels, Lüder Behrens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The inflammatory myopathies include dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and inclusion body myositis. In dermatomyositis, muscle fiber injury is secondary to an antibody- or immune-complex-mediated immune response against a vascular-endothelial component. In polymyositis and inclusion body myositis, CD8+ T cells and macrophages invade and eventually destroy initially nonnecrotic muscle fibers. The autoaggressive T cells have the phenotype of activated (HLA-DR+) memory (CD45RO+) cells. T-cell receptor analyses indicate that the autoaggressive T cells are oligoclonal. In inflammatory lesions, muscle fibers express various cytoplasmic and surface molecules that are not detectable in normal fibers. These molecules, which include HLA class I antigens, heat-shock proteins, adhesion molecules, and Fas, are probably induced by locally secreted cytokines. The autoaggressive CD8+ T cells harbor granules containing perforin that aggregate near the contact zone with the target muscle fiber. This is consistent with a perforin- and secretion-dependent mechanism of muscle fiber injury. Many invaded muscle fibers also express the Fas 'death receptor,' but signs of apoptosis are absent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)520-526
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Rheumatology
Volume9
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1997

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Myositis
Muscles
Inclusion Body Myositis
T-Lymphocytes
Perforin
Dermatomyositis
CD95 Antigens
Polymyositis
Death Domain Receptors
Histocompatibility Antigens Class I
Wounds and Injuries
HLA-DR Antigens
HLA Antigens
Heat-Shock Proteins
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Antigen-Antibody Complex
Blood Vessels
Macrophages
Apoptosis
Cytokines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Hohlfeld, R., Engel, A. G., Goebels, N., & Behrens, L. (1997). Cellular immune mechanisms in inflammatory myopathies. Current Opinion in Rheumatology, 9(6), 520-526.

Cellular immune mechanisms in inflammatory myopathies. / Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Engel, Andrew G; Goebels, Norbert; Behrens, Lüder.

In: Current Opinion in Rheumatology, Vol. 9, No. 6, 1997, p. 520-526.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hohlfeld, R, Engel, AG, Goebels, N & Behrens, L 1997, 'Cellular immune mechanisms in inflammatory myopathies', Current Opinion in Rheumatology, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 520-526.
Hohlfeld, Reinhard ; Engel, Andrew G ; Goebels, Norbert ; Behrens, Lüder. / Cellular immune mechanisms in inflammatory myopathies. In: Current Opinion in Rheumatology. 1997 ; Vol. 9, No. 6. pp. 520-526.
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