Cell therapy for cardiac repair-lessons from clinical trials

Atta Behfar, Ruben Crespo-Diaz, Andre Terzic, Bernard J. Gersh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

162 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The global impetus to identify curative therapies has been fuelled by the unmet needs of patients in the context of a growing heart failure pandemic. To date, regeneration trials in patients with cardiovascular disease have used stem-cell-based therapy in the period immediately after myocardial injury, in an attempt to halt progression towards ischaemic cardiomyopathy, or in the setting of congestive heart failure, to target the disease process and prevent organ decompensation. Worldwide, several thousand patients have now been treated using autologous cell-based therapy; the safety and feasibility of this approach has been established, pitfalls have been identified, and optimization procedures envisioned. Furthermore, the initiation of phase III trials to further validate the therapeutic value of cell-based regenerative medicine and address the barriers to successful clinical implementation has led to resurgence in the enthusiasm for such treatments among patients and health-care providers. In particular, poor definition of cell types used, diversity in cell-handling procedures, and functional variability intrinsic to autologously-derived cells have been identified as the main factors limiting adoption of cell-based therapies. In this Review, we summarize the experience obtained from trials of 'first-generation' cell-based therapy, and emphasize the advances in the purification and lineage specification of stem cells that have enabled the development of 'next-generation' stem-cell-based therapies targeting cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-246
Number of pages15
JournalNature Reviews Cardiology
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Clinical Trials
Stem Cells
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Failure
Regenerative Medicine
Pandemics
Cardiomyopathies
Health Personnel
Regeneration
Patient Care
Therapeutics
Safety
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Cell therapy for cardiac repair-lessons from clinical trials. / Behfar, Atta; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben; Terzic, Andre; Gersh, Bernard J.

In: Nature Reviews Cardiology, Vol. 11, No. 4, 2014, p. 232-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Behfar, Atta ; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben ; Terzic, Andre ; Gersh, Bernard J. / Cell therapy for cardiac repair-lessons from clinical trials. In: Nature Reviews Cardiology. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 232-246.
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