Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses: Fed ex for cancer therapy

Candice Willmon, Kevin Harrington, Timothy Kottke, Robin Prestwich, Alan Melcher, Richard Geoffrey Vile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oncolytic viruses delivered directly into the circulation face many hazards that impede their localization to, and infection of, metastatic tumors. Such barriers to systemic delivery could be overcome if couriers, which confer both protection, and tumor localization, to their viral cargoes, could be found. Several preclincal studies have shown that viruses can be loaded into, or onto, different types of cells without losing the biological activity of either virus or cell carrier. Importantly, such loading can significantly protect the viruses from immune-mediated virus-neutralizing activities, including antiviral antibody. Moreover, an impressive portfolio of cellular vehicles, which have some degree of tropism for tumor cells themselves, or for the biological properties associated with the tumor stroma, is already available. Therefore, it will soon be possible to initiate clinical protocols to test the hypopthesis that cell-mediated delivery can permit efficient shipping of oncolytic viruses from the loading bay (the production laboratory) directly to the tumor in immune-competent patients with metastatic disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1667-1676
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular Therapy
Volume17
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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Oncolytic Viruses
Viruses
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Tropism
Clinical Protocols
Antiviral Agents
Antibodies
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Drug Discovery
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Willmon, C., Harrington, K., Kottke, T., Prestwich, R., Melcher, A., & Vile, R. G. (2009). Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses: Fed ex for cancer therapy. Molecular Therapy, 17(10), 1667-1676. https://doi.org/10.1038/mt.2009.194

Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses : Fed ex for cancer therapy. / Willmon, Candice; Harrington, Kevin; Kottke, Timothy; Prestwich, Robin; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard Geoffrey.

In: Molecular Therapy, Vol. 17, No. 10, 2009, p. 1667-1676.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Willmon, C, Harrington, K, Kottke, T, Prestwich, R, Melcher, A & Vile, RG 2009, 'Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses: Fed ex for cancer therapy', Molecular Therapy, vol. 17, no. 10, pp. 1667-1676. https://doi.org/10.1038/mt.2009.194
Willmon C, Harrington K, Kottke T, Prestwich R, Melcher A, Vile RG. Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses: Fed ex for cancer therapy. Molecular Therapy. 2009;17(10):1667-1676. https://doi.org/10.1038/mt.2009.194
Willmon, Candice ; Harrington, Kevin ; Kottke, Timothy ; Prestwich, Robin ; Melcher, Alan ; Vile, Richard Geoffrey. / Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses : Fed ex for cancer therapy. In: Molecular Therapy. 2009 ; Vol. 17, No. 10. pp. 1667-1676.
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