CD28- T cells: their role in the age-associated decline of immune function

Nan ping Weng, Arne N. Akbar, Jorg Goronzy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

353 Scopus citations

Abstract

The accumulation of CD28- T cells, particularly within the CD8 subset, is one of the most prominent changes during T-cell homeostasis and function associated with aging in humans. CD28, a major co-stimulatory receptor, is responsible for the optimal antigen-mediated T-cell activation, proliferation and survival of T cells. CD28- T cells exhibit reduced antigen receptor diversity, defective antigen-induced proliferation and a shorter replicative lifespan while showing enhanced cytotoxicity and regulatory functions. Gene expression analyses reveal profound changes of CD28- T cells in comparison to their CD28+ counterparts and corroborate their functional differences. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of CD28- T cells and their role in the age-associated decline of immune function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-312
Number of pages7
JournalTrends in Immunology
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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