Causes and palliation of transfusion-associated vaginal bleeding in patients with metastatic cancer

Amie E. Jackson, Elisabeth K. Stephens, Aminah Jatoi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The current study was undertaken (1) to capture a clinically relevant, systematically collected series of patients with metastatic cancer and transfusion-associated vaginal bleeding and (2) to provide insight into how best to palliate this bleeding. Methods/Results: As part of a single-institution review, 46 patients with metastatic cancer and transfusion-associated vaginal bleeding were identified. In a minority, 14 (30%), the cancer itself was directly responsible for the bleeding, and under these circumstances, gynecological cancerwas themost frequent cause. In 13 patients (28%),more than 1 palliative intervention was attempted. Of all the interventions, a hysterectomy was performed most frequently and was successful in 11 patients. The use of ablation or embolization procedures was rarely tried but successful in 4 patients. However, 2 patients died of vaginal bleeding, despite multiple palliative procedures to control bleeding, including tumor embolization in one. Conclusions: Transfusion-associated vaginal bleeding in patients with etastatic cancer can arise from nonmalignant causes and often assumes an uneventful course but can, at times, be serious and difficult to control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-175
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecological Cancer
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Anemia
  • Hemorrhage
  • Palliation
  • Uterine bleeding
  • Vaginal bleeding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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