Capsular contracture in the modern era: A multidisciplinary look at the incidence and risk factors after mastectomy and implant-based breast reconstruction

Jacob B. Hammond, Heidi E. Kosiorek, Patricia A. Cronin, Alanna M. Rebecca, William J. Casey, William W Wong, Carlos E. Vargas, Tamara Z. Vern-Gross, Lisa A. McGee, Barbara A. Pockaj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Capsular contracture causes pain, poor cosmesis, and reoperations. This study analyzes its incidence and risk factors in a more modern treatment era. Methods: Patients undergoing mastectomy with implant reconstruction from 2010 to 18 were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analysis evaluated rates and risk factors for capsular contracture. Results: Among 451 patients, the majority underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy (262, 58.1%) with one-stage reconstruction (283, 62.7%) utilizing subpectoral implants (353, 77.4%) and acellular dermal matrix (354, 78.5%). Overall capsular contracture incidence was 9.8%; the rate after post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was 18.7%, and 7.5% for patients without PMRT. Significant factors included neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.006), hematoma (P = 0.047), and PMRT (P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that PMRT increased risk of capsular contracture (OR = 3.12, 95% CI 1.55–6.26, P = 0.001), and adjuvant chemotherapy was protective (OR = 0.289, 95% CI 0.114–0.731, P = 0.01). Conclusions: Incidence of capsular contracture is lower than previously reported. Advancing therapeutic techniques may reduce the risk of this complication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Breast reconstruction
  • Capsular contracture
  • Mastectomy
  • Nipple-sparing
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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