Cancer risk after evalution for infertility

L. A. Brinton, L. J. Melton, G. D. Malkasian, A. Bond, R. Hoover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To evaluate cancer risk by various causes of infertility, the authors conducted a retrospective cohort study among 2,335 women evaluated for infertility at the Mayo Clinic between 1935 and 1964. Most cancers occurred at expected frequencies, with the exception of cancers of the thyroid (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 2.6) and other endocrine glands (SIR = 6.7), although analyses were based on small numbers. Patients with progesterone deficiencies (31 per cent of the study subjects) had a 20 per cent higher cancer risk than did those with other causes of infertility, with excesses deriving primarily from cancers of the lung, cervix, ovary, and thyroid and from melanoma. Breast cancer risk, however, was not elevated in either patients with progesterone deficiencies (SIR = 0.9) or patients with other causes of infertility (SIR = 1.0). Examination of other parameters of infertility, including age at evaluation, type of infertility (primary vs. secondary), and years of attempted conception, showed no elevated risks of breast cancer in any subgroup. These results fail to support previous studies that have linked progesterone deficiencies among infertile women to elevated breast cancer risk. However, the data suggest a possible involvement of a progesterone deficiency in the etiology of other cancers, particularly thyroid cancer and melanoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)712-722
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume129
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1989

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Infertility
Progesterone
Thyroid Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Incidence
Breast Neoplasms
Melanoma
Endocrine Glands
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Ovary
Lung Neoplasms
Thyroid Gland
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Brinton, L. A., Melton, L. J., Malkasian, G. D., Bond, A., & Hoover, R. (1989). Cancer risk after evalution for infertility. American Journal of Epidemiology, 129(4), 712-722.

Cancer risk after evalution for infertility. / Brinton, L. A.; Melton, L. J.; Malkasian, G. D.; Bond, A.; Hoover, R.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 129, No. 4, 1989, p. 712-722.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brinton, LA, Melton, LJ, Malkasian, GD, Bond, A & Hoover, R 1989, 'Cancer risk after evalution for infertility', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 129, no. 4, pp. 712-722.
Brinton LA, Melton LJ, Malkasian GD, Bond A, Hoover R. Cancer risk after evalution for infertility. American Journal of Epidemiology. 1989;129(4):712-722.
Brinton, L. A. ; Melton, L. J. ; Malkasian, G. D. ; Bond, A. ; Hoover, R. / Cancer risk after evalution for infertility. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 1989 ; Vol. 129, No. 4. pp. 712-722.
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