Can symptoms predict endoscopic findings in GERD?

G. Richard Locke, Alan R. Zinsmeister, Nicholas J. Talley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: It is difficult to decide which patients with reflux symptoms require endoscopy. The aim of this study was to develop a scoring system to predict esophageal findings at endoscopy. Methods: A consecutive sample of 1011 adult patients scheduled for upper endoscopy were asked to complete a validated symptom questionnaire. The endoscopy reports were abstracted. Individual logistic regression models were developed to predict esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus (long and short segment) and esophageal stricture, including Schatzki's ring. Results: Reflux esophagitis was independently associated with heartburn frequency (p < 0.0001) but not severity or duration (p > 0.05). Barrett's esophagus was associated with the duration of acid regurgitation (p < 0.005) but not with frequency or severity (p > 0.05). Strictures were associated with dysphagia severity (p < 0.0001) and duration (p < 0.0001) but not frequency (p > 0.05). At a sensitivity of 80%, the models had a specificity of 49% for esophagitis, 57% for Barrett's esophagus, and 68% for strictures. At a specificity of 80%, the sensitivities were 51% for esophagitis, 62% for Barrett's esophagus and 71% for strictures. Conclusions: Endoscopic findings were associated with distinct attributes of reflux symptoms. Symptoms are only modestly predictive of findings at endoscopy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)661-670
Number of pages10
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume58
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003

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Gastroesophageal Reflux
Barrett Esophagus
Endoscopy
Esophagitis
Pathologic Constriction
Logistic Models
Esophageal Stenosis
Heartburn
Peptic Esophagitis
Deglutition Disorders
Sensitivity and Specificity
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Can symptoms predict endoscopic findings in GERD? / Locke, G. Richard; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Talley, Nicholas J.

In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol. 58, No. 5, 11.2003, p. 661-670.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Locke, GR, Zinsmeister, AR & Talley, NJ 2003, 'Can symptoms predict endoscopic findings in GERD?', Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vol. 58, no. 5, pp. 661-670. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0016-5107(03)02011-X
Locke, G. Richard ; Zinsmeister, Alan R. ; Talley, Nicholas J. / Can symptoms predict endoscopic findings in GERD?. In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 2003 ; Vol. 58, No. 5. pp. 661-670.
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