Can aerobic exercise protect against dementia?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are more than 36 million people in the US over the age of 65, and all of them are impacted by the cognitive decline and brain atrophy associated with normal aging and dementia-causing conditions like Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body disease, and vascular dementia. Recently, moderate exercise and improved fitness have been shown to enhance cognition in cognitively normal older persons as well as in individuals who complain of memory difficulty. Additionally, fitness correlates with brain volume in persons who are cognitively normal and those with Alzheimer's disease. Exercise in mouse models causes neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. This review will discuss animal experiments, epidemiology, limited prospective studies, and biomarker data that make the case that prospective blinded studies are urgently needed to evaluate the role of aerobic exercise in protecting against dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6
JournalAlzheimer's Research and Therapy
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Lewy Body Disease
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Prospective Studies
Exercise
Vascular Dementia
Neurogenesis
Dentate Gyrus
Brain
Cognition
Atrophy
Epidemiology
Biomarkers
Cognitive Dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Can aerobic exercise protect against dementia? / Graff Radford, Neill R.

In: Alzheimer's Research and Therapy, Vol. 3, No. 1, 6, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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