Campylobacter pylori and Barrett's esophagus

N. J. Talley, A. J. Cameron, R. G. Shorter, A. R. Zinsmeister, S. F. Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Campylobacter pylori is thought to be confined to gastric mucosa; when detected in the duodenum in association with duodenal ulceration, the organism infects only areas of gastric metaplasia. Barrett's esophagus is a metaplastic condition of the esophagus, in which areas or islands of 'gastric-type' epithelium are found. To determine whether C. pylori colonized the esophagus of patients with Barrett's esophagus, we studied retrospectively 23 unselected patients who had endoscopic and biopsy evidence of Barrett's eophagus. Mucosal biopsy specimens were stained by the Warthin-Starry silver technique and reviewed by an experienced, 'blinded' histopathologist. Of the 23 patients, 12 (52%) had C. pylori in the esophagus. Patients with and those without C. pylori were of similar age and gender, had similar scores for acute and chronic inflammation, and had similar lengths of tubular esophagus with metaplastic gastric mucosa. These observations suggest that C. pylori commonly infects Barrett's esophagus. The clinical importance of this finding is unknown.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1176-1180
Number of pages5
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume63
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1988

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Barrett Esophagus
Helicobacter pylori
Esophagus
Gastric Mucosa
Stomach
Biopsy
Metaplasia
Duodenum
Silver
Islands
Epithelium
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Talley, N. J., Cameron, A. J., Shorter, R. G., Zinsmeister, A. R., & Phillips, S. F. (1988). Campylobacter pylori and Barrett's esophagus. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 63(12), 1176-1180.

Campylobacter pylori and Barrett's esophagus. / Talley, N. J.; Cameron, A. J.; Shorter, R. G.; Zinsmeister, A. R.; Phillips, S. F.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 63, No. 12, 1988, p. 1176-1180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Talley, NJ, Cameron, AJ, Shorter, RG, Zinsmeister, AR & Phillips, SF 1988, 'Campylobacter pylori and Barrett's esophagus', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 63, no. 12, pp. 1176-1180.
Talley NJ, Cameron AJ, Shorter RG, Zinsmeister AR, Phillips SF. Campylobacter pylori and Barrett's esophagus. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1988;63(12):1176-1180.
Talley, N. J. ; Cameron, A. J. ; Shorter, R. G. ; Zinsmeister, A. R. ; Phillips, S. F. / Campylobacter pylori and Barrett's esophagus. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1988 ; Vol. 63, No. 12. pp. 1176-1180.
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