Building a protocol expressway: The case of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center

Terre A. McJoynt, Muhanad A. Hirzallah, Daniel V. Satele, Jason H. Pitzen, Steven Robert Alberts, S Vincent Rajkumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Inconsistencies and errors resulting from nonstandard processes, together with redundancies, rework, and excess workload, lead to extended time frames for clinical trial protocol development. This results in dissatisfaction among sponsors, investigators, and staff and restricts the availability of novel treatment options for patients. Methods: A team of experts from Mayo Clinic formed, including Protocol Development Unit staff and management from the three Mayo Clinic campuses (Florida, Minnesota, and Arizona), a systems and procedures analyst, a quality office analyst, and two physician members to address the identified deficiencies. The current-state process was intensively reviewed, and improvement steps were taken to accelerate the development and approval of cancer-related clinical trials. The primary goal was to decrease the time from receipt of a new protocol through submission to an approving authority, such as the National Cancer Institute or institutional review board. Results: Using the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control (DMAIC) framework infused with Lean waste-reduction methodologies, areas were identified for improvement, including enhancing first-time quality and processing new studies on a first-in/first-out basis. The project was successful in improving the mean turnaround time for internally authored protocols (P < .001) from 25.00 weeks (n = 41; range, 3.43 to 94.14 weeks) to 10.15 weeks (n = 14; range, 4.00 to 22.14 weeks). The mean turnaround time for externally authored protocols was improved (P < .001) from 20.61 weeks (n = 85; range, 3.29 to 108.57 weeks) to 7.79 weeks (n = 50; range, 2.00 to 20.86 weeks). Conclusion: DMAIC framework combined with Lean methodologies is an effective tool to structure the definition, planning, analysis, and implementation of significant process changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3855-3860
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume27
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 10 2009

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Clinical Protocols
Neoplasms
Clinical Trials
Staff Development
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Research Ethics Committees
Workload
Research Personnel
Physicians
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

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Building a protocol expressway : The case of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. / McJoynt, Terre A.; Hirzallah, Muhanad A.; Satele, Daniel V.; Pitzen, Jason H.; Alberts, Steven Robert; Rajkumar, S Vincent.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 27, No. 23, 10.08.2009, p. 3855-3860.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McJoynt, Terre A. ; Hirzallah, Muhanad A. ; Satele, Daniel V. ; Pitzen, Jason H. ; Alberts, Steven Robert ; Rajkumar, S Vincent. / Building a protocol expressway : The case of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2009 ; Vol. 27, No. 23. pp. 3855-3860.
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