Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid angiotensin-converting enzyme in interstitial lung diseases

Ulrich Specks, W. J. Martin, M. S. Rohrbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study we evaluated the disease specificity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid angiotensin-converting enzyme (BALF-ACE), its correlation with cellular constituents of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and for sarcoidosis, with other proposed markers of disease activity. Furthermore, the question of the clinical value of BALF-ACE determinations in interstitial lung diseases or any of its subgroups was addressed. The study population consisted of 222 patients, 69 with biopsy proven sarcoidosis, 3 with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 4 with acute histoplasmosis, 27 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), 4 with rheumatoid arthritis-related interstitial fibrosis, 9 with pulmonary drug toxicity, 16 with pulmonary malignancies, 26 with other parenchymal lung disease entities, and 30 in whom the final diagnosis remained indeterminate. Elevated BALF-ACE concentrations were seen in all diagnostic categories. In sarcoidosis BALF-ACE levels correlated well with lavage lymphocyte counts (r = 0.49; p < 0.0001), in contrast to IPF where they correlated well with lavage neutrophil counts (r = 0.51; p < 0.007). The correlation of BALF-ACE with serum-ACE was significant. In sarcoidosis the mean BALF-ACE level was lower for patients with Stage-I chest roentgenographic patterns (0.664 U/L), compared to those with Stag II (1.112 U/L) and Stage III (1.083 U/L). It was concluded that elevated BALF-ACE levels are not specific for sarcoidosis. The correlations of BALF-ACE levels with different cellular constituents of BALF suggest a different cellular origin of BALF-ACE. In sarcoidosis BALF-ACE levels correlate well with other proposed markers of disease activity and seem to reflect pulmonary activity better than serum ACE. However, the clinical usefulness of BALF-ACE determinations cannot be supported.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-123
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Review of Respiratory Disease
Volume141
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Interstitial Lung Diseases
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Sarcoidosis
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Therapeutic Irrigation
Lung
Extrinsic Allergic Alveolitis
Histoplasmosis
Lymphocyte Count
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Serum
Lung Diseases
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Neutrophils
Fibrosis
Thorax

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid angiotensin-converting enzyme in interstitial lung diseases. / Specks, Ulrich; Martin, W. J.; Rohrbach, M. S.

In: American Review of Respiratory Disease, Vol. 141, No. 1, 1990, p. 117-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{61525598ec97445696ea4fa3c54cc606,
title = "Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid angiotensin-converting enzyme in interstitial lung diseases",
abstract = "In this study we evaluated the disease specificity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid angiotensin-converting enzyme (BALF-ACE), its correlation with cellular constituents of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and for sarcoidosis, with other proposed markers of disease activity. Furthermore, the question of the clinical value of BALF-ACE determinations in interstitial lung diseases or any of its subgroups was addressed. The study population consisted of 222 patients, 69 with biopsy proven sarcoidosis, 3 with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 4 with acute histoplasmosis, 27 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), 4 with rheumatoid arthritis-related interstitial fibrosis, 9 with pulmonary drug toxicity, 16 with pulmonary malignancies, 26 with other parenchymal lung disease entities, and 30 in whom the final diagnosis remained indeterminate. Elevated BALF-ACE concentrations were seen in all diagnostic categories. In sarcoidosis BALF-ACE levels correlated well with lavage lymphocyte counts (r = 0.49; p < 0.0001), in contrast to IPF where they correlated well with lavage neutrophil counts (r = 0.51; p < 0.007). The correlation of BALF-ACE with serum-ACE was significant. In sarcoidosis the mean BALF-ACE level was lower for patients with Stage-I chest roentgenographic patterns (0.664 U/L), compared to those with Stag II (1.112 U/L) and Stage III (1.083 U/L). It was concluded that elevated BALF-ACE levels are not specific for sarcoidosis. The correlations of BALF-ACE levels with different cellular constituents of BALF suggest a different cellular origin of BALF-ACE. In sarcoidosis BALF-ACE levels correlate well with other proposed markers of disease activity and seem to reflect pulmonary activity better than serum ACE. However, the clinical usefulness of BALF-ACE determinations cannot be supported.",
author = "Ulrich Specks and Martin, {W. J.} and Rohrbach, {M. S.}",
year = "1990",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "141",
pages = "117--123",
journal = "American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine",
issn = "1073-449X",
publisher = "American Thoracic Society",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid angiotensin-converting enzyme in interstitial lung diseases

AU - Specks, Ulrich

AU - Martin, W. J.

AU - Rohrbach, M. S.

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - In this study we evaluated the disease specificity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid angiotensin-converting enzyme (BALF-ACE), its correlation with cellular constituents of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and for sarcoidosis, with other proposed markers of disease activity. Furthermore, the question of the clinical value of BALF-ACE determinations in interstitial lung diseases or any of its subgroups was addressed. The study population consisted of 222 patients, 69 with biopsy proven sarcoidosis, 3 with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 4 with acute histoplasmosis, 27 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), 4 with rheumatoid arthritis-related interstitial fibrosis, 9 with pulmonary drug toxicity, 16 with pulmonary malignancies, 26 with other parenchymal lung disease entities, and 30 in whom the final diagnosis remained indeterminate. Elevated BALF-ACE concentrations were seen in all diagnostic categories. In sarcoidosis BALF-ACE levels correlated well with lavage lymphocyte counts (r = 0.49; p < 0.0001), in contrast to IPF where they correlated well with lavage neutrophil counts (r = 0.51; p < 0.007). The correlation of BALF-ACE with serum-ACE was significant. In sarcoidosis the mean BALF-ACE level was lower for patients with Stage-I chest roentgenographic patterns (0.664 U/L), compared to those with Stag II (1.112 U/L) and Stage III (1.083 U/L). It was concluded that elevated BALF-ACE levels are not specific for sarcoidosis. The correlations of BALF-ACE levels with different cellular constituents of BALF suggest a different cellular origin of BALF-ACE. In sarcoidosis BALF-ACE levels correlate well with other proposed markers of disease activity and seem to reflect pulmonary activity better than serum ACE. However, the clinical usefulness of BALF-ACE determinations cannot be supported.

AB - In this study we evaluated the disease specificity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid angiotensin-converting enzyme (BALF-ACE), its correlation with cellular constituents of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and for sarcoidosis, with other proposed markers of disease activity. Furthermore, the question of the clinical value of BALF-ACE determinations in interstitial lung diseases or any of its subgroups was addressed. The study population consisted of 222 patients, 69 with biopsy proven sarcoidosis, 3 with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 4 with acute histoplasmosis, 27 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), 4 with rheumatoid arthritis-related interstitial fibrosis, 9 with pulmonary drug toxicity, 16 with pulmonary malignancies, 26 with other parenchymal lung disease entities, and 30 in whom the final diagnosis remained indeterminate. Elevated BALF-ACE concentrations were seen in all diagnostic categories. In sarcoidosis BALF-ACE levels correlated well with lavage lymphocyte counts (r = 0.49; p < 0.0001), in contrast to IPF where they correlated well with lavage neutrophil counts (r = 0.51; p < 0.007). The correlation of BALF-ACE with serum-ACE was significant. In sarcoidosis the mean BALF-ACE level was lower for patients with Stage-I chest roentgenographic patterns (0.664 U/L), compared to those with Stag II (1.112 U/L) and Stage III (1.083 U/L). It was concluded that elevated BALF-ACE levels are not specific for sarcoidosis. The correlations of BALF-ACE levels with different cellular constituents of BALF suggest a different cellular origin of BALF-ACE. In sarcoidosis BALF-ACE levels correlate well with other proposed markers of disease activity and seem to reflect pulmonary activity better than serum ACE. However, the clinical usefulness of BALF-ACE determinations cannot be supported.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025096759&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025096759&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2153351

AN - SCOPUS:0025096759

VL - 141

SP - 117

EP - 123

JO - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

JF - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

SN - 1073-449X

IS - 1

ER -