Brief Multiple Behavior Interventions in a College Student Health Care Clinic

C. E (C ) Werch, Hui Bian, Michele J. Moore, Steve Ames, Carlo C. DiClemente, Robert M. Weiler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined the effects of brief image-based interventions, including a multiple behavior health contract, a one-on-one tailored consultation, and a combined consultation plus contract intervention, for impacting multiple health behaviors of students in a university health clinic. Methods: A total of 155 college students attending a major southern university were recruited to participate in a study evaluating a health promotion program titled Project Fitness during the fall 2005 and spring 2006. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatments as they presented at the clinic: 1) a multiple behavior health contract, 2) a one-on-one tailored consultation, or 3) a combined consultation plus contract intervention. Baseline and 1-month post-intervention data were collected using computer-assisted questionnaires in a quiet office within the student health clinic. Results: Omnibus repeated-measures analyses of variance were significant for drinking driving behaviors, F(2,136) = 4.43, p = .01, exercise behaviors, F(5,140) = 6.12, p = .00, nutrition habits, F(3,143) = 5.37, p = .00, sleep habits, F(2,144) = 5.03, p = .01, and health quality of life, F(5,140) = 3.09, p = .01, with improvements on each behavior across time. Analysis of group-by-time interaction effects showed an increase in the use of techniques to manage stress, F(2,144) = 5.48, p = .01, and the number of health behavior goals set in the last 30 days, F(2,143) = 5.35, p = .01, but only among adolescents receiving the consultation, or consultation plus contract. Effect sizes were consistently larger across health behaviors, and medium in size, when both consult and contract were used together. Conclusions: Brief interventions using a positive goal image of fitness, and addressing a number of health habits using a contract and consultation strategy alone, or in combination, have the potential to influence positive changes in multiple health behaviors of college students attending a university primary health care clinic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)577-585
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

Fingerprint

Contracts
Referral and Consultation
Students
Delivery of Health Care
Health Behavior
Health
Habits
Drinking Behavior
Health Promotion
Primary Health Care
Analysis of Variance
Sleep
Quality of Life
Exercise

Keywords

  • Brief intervention
  • College students
  • Health care clinic
  • Images
  • Multiple behaviors
  • Positive youth development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Werch, C. E. C. ., Bian, H., Moore, M. J., Ames, S., DiClemente, C. C., & Weiler, R. M. (2007). Brief Multiple Behavior Interventions in a College Student Health Care Clinic. Journal of Adolescent Health, 41(6), 577-585. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2007.06.003

Brief Multiple Behavior Interventions in a College Student Health Care Clinic. / Werch, C. E (C ); Bian, Hui; Moore, Michele J.; Ames, Steve; DiClemente, Carlo C.; Weiler, Robert M.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 41, No. 6, 12.2007, p. 577-585.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Werch, CEC, Bian, H, Moore, MJ, Ames, S, DiClemente, CC & Weiler, RM 2007, 'Brief Multiple Behavior Interventions in a College Student Health Care Clinic', Journal of Adolescent Health, vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 577-585. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2007.06.003
Werch, C. E (C ) ; Bian, Hui ; Moore, Michele J. ; Ames, Steve ; DiClemente, Carlo C. ; Weiler, Robert M. / Brief Multiple Behavior Interventions in a College Student Health Care Clinic. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2007 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 577-585.
@article{ffe88e8d27604ef581fa7a19e339e1a8,
title = "Brief Multiple Behavior Interventions in a College Student Health Care Clinic",
abstract = "Purpose: This study examined the effects of brief image-based interventions, including a multiple behavior health contract, a one-on-one tailored consultation, and a combined consultation plus contract intervention, for impacting multiple health behaviors of students in a university health clinic. Methods: A total of 155 college students attending a major southern university were recruited to participate in a study evaluating a health promotion program titled Project Fitness during the fall 2005 and spring 2006. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatments as they presented at the clinic: 1) a multiple behavior health contract, 2) a one-on-one tailored consultation, or 3) a combined consultation plus contract intervention. Baseline and 1-month post-intervention data were collected using computer-assisted questionnaires in a quiet office within the student health clinic. Results: Omnibus repeated-measures analyses of variance were significant for drinking driving behaviors, F(2,136) = 4.43, p = .01, exercise behaviors, F(5,140) = 6.12, p = .00, nutrition habits, F(3,143) = 5.37, p = .00, sleep habits, F(2,144) = 5.03, p = .01, and health quality of life, F(5,140) = 3.09, p = .01, with improvements on each behavior across time. Analysis of group-by-time interaction effects showed an increase in the use of techniques to manage stress, F(2,144) = 5.48, p = .01, and the number of health behavior goals set in the last 30 days, F(2,143) = 5.35, p = .01, but only among adolescents receiving the consultation, or consultation plus contract. Effect sizes were consistently larger across health behaviors, and medium in size, when both consult and contract were used together. Conclusions: Brief interventions using a positive goal image of fitness, and addressing a number of health habits using a contract and consultation strategy alone, or in combination, have the potential to influence positive changes in multiple health behaviors of college students attending a university primary health care clinic.",
keywords = "Brief intervention, College students, Health care clinic, Images, Multiple behaviors, Positive youth development",
author = "Werch, {C. E (C )} and Hui Bian and Moore, {Michele J.} and Steve Ames and DiClemente, {Carlo C.} and Weiler, {Robert M.}",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.jadohealth.2007.06.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "577--585",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Brief Multiple Behavior Interventions in a College Student Health Care Clinic

AU - Werch, C. E (C )

AU - Bian, Hui

AU - Moore, Michele J.

AU - Ames, Steve

AU - DiClemente, Carlo C.

AU - Weiler, Robert M.

PY - 2007/12

Y1 - 2007/12

N2 - Purpose: This study examined the effects of brief image-based interventions, including a multiple behavior health contract, a one-on-one tailored consultation, and a combined consultation plus contract intervention, for impacting multiple health behaviors of students in a university health clinic. Methods: A total of 155 college students attending a major southern university were recruited to participate in a study evaluating a health promotion program titled Project Fitness during the fall 2005 and spring 2006. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatments as they presented at the clinic: 1) a multiple behavior health contract, 2) a one-on-one tailored consultation, or 3) a combined consultation plus contract intervention. Baseline and 1-month post-intervention data were collected using computer-assisted questionnaires in a quiet office within the student health clinic. Results: Omnibus repeated-measures analyses of variance were significant for drinking driving behaviors, F(2,136) = 4.43, p = .01, exercise behaviors, F(5,140) = 6.12, p = .00, nutrition habits, F(3,143) = 5.37, p = .00, sleep habits, F(2,144) = 5.03, p = .01, and health quality of life, F(5,140) = 3.09, p = .01, with improvements on each behavior across time. Analysis of group-by-time interaction effects showed an increase in the use of techniques to manage stress, F(2,144) = 5.48, p = .01, and the number of health behavior goals set in the last 30 days, F(2,143) = 5.35, p = .01, but only among adolescents receiving the consultation, or consultation plus contract. Effect sizes were consistently larger across health behaviors, and medium in size, when both consult and contract were used together. Conclusions: Brief interventions using a positive goal image of fitness, and addressing a number of health habits using a contract and consultation strategy alone, or in combination, have the potential to influence positive changes in multiple health behaviors of college students attending a university primary health care clinic.

AB - Purpose: This study examined the effects of brief image-based interventions, including a multiple behavior health contract, a one-on-one tailored consultation, and a combined consultation plus contract intervention, for impacting multiple health behaviors of students in a university health clinic. Methods: A total of 155 college students attending a major southern university were recruited to participate in a study evaluating a health promotion program titled Project Fitness during the fall 2005 and spring 2006. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatments as they presented at the clinic: 1) a multiple behavior health contract, 2) a one-on-one tailored consultation, or 3) a combined consultation plus contract intervention. Baseline and 1-month post-intervention data were collected using computer-assisted questionnaires in a quiet office within the student health clinic. Results: Omnibus repeated-measures analyses of variance were significant for drinking driving behaviors, F(2,136) = 4.43, p = .01, exercise behaviors, F(5,140) = 6.12, p = .00, nutrition habits, F(3,143) = 5.37, p = .00, sleep habits, F(2,144) = 5.03, p = .01, and health quality of life, F(5,140) = 3.09, p = .01, with improvements on each behavior across time. Analysis of group-by-time interaction effects showed an increase in the use of techniques to manage stress, F(2,144) = 5.48, p = .01, and the number of health behavior goals set in the last 30 days, F(2,143) = 5.35, p = .01, but only among adolescents receiving the consultation, or consultation plus contract. Effect sizes were consistently larger across health behaviors, and medium in size, when both consult and contract were used together. Conclusions: Brief interventions using a positive goal image of fitness, and addressing a number of health habits using a contract and consultation strategy alone, or in combination, have the potential to influence positive changes in multiple health behaviors of college students attending a university primary health care clinic.

KW - Brief intervention

KW - College students

KW - Health care clinic

KW - Images

KW - Multiple behaviors

KW - Positive youth development

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=36049022407&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=36049022407&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2007.06.003

DO - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2007.06.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 18023787

AN - SCOPUS:36049022407

VL - 41

SP - 577

EP - 585

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 6

ER -