Bridge to decision: SWAT team approach used by Mayo Clinic Arizona's cardiac transport team.

Linda L. Staley, Jeff Dobberpuhl, Christopher N. Pierce, Robert L Scott, Dawn E. Jaroszewski, Francisco A. Arabia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Patients in acute cardiogenic shock are the most challenging patients to manage. Unless a mechanical circulatory assist device is placed, maintaining end-organ function can be difficult. Transporting cardiogenic shock patients to tertiary care centers for higher level care also is difficult. The Mayo Clinic Arizona uses a SWAT team approach to deploy a specialized medical or surgical multidisciplinary team to implant mechanical circulatory assist devices at referring hospitals and transport patients back to Mayo Clinic Arizona. RESULTS: The cardiac transport team at Mayo Clinic Arizona got 23 referrals from 15 local community hospitals from February 2006 to September 2009. The medical team deployed for transfers of 6 patients, 3 of whom survived to hospital discharge. The surgical transport team deployed for transfers of 17 patients (6 with left ventricular assist devices, 2 with right ventricular assist devices, 5 with biventricular assist devices, and 4 with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), of whom 8 survived to hospital discharge. Ten of the 17 referrals (59%) required a surgeon to place a mechanical circulatory assist device at the referring hospital. CONCLUSION: The SWAT team approach allows cardiogenic shock patients to be stabilized at the referring hospital by heart failure and cardiac surgical specialists. If necessary, a surgeon from Mayo Clinic Arizona places a mechanical circulatory assist device at the referring hospital to stabilize the patient. Doing so allows safe transport back to the tertiary care center for higher level care and possible transplant evaluation with placement of a long-term durable device.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-124
Number of pages7
JournalProgress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.)
Volume20
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 2010

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Equipment and Supplies
Cardiogenic Shock
Patient Transfer
Heart-Assist Devices
Tertiary Care Centers
Referral and Consultation
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Community Hospital
Heart Failure
Transplants
Surgeons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Staley, L. L., Dobberpuhl, J., Pierce, C. N., Scott, R. L., Jaroszewski, D. E., & Arabia, F. A. (2010). Bridge to decision: SWAT team approach used by Mayo Clinic Arizona's cardiac transport team. Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), 20(2), 118-124.

Bridge to decision : SWAT team approach used by Mayo Clinic Arizona's cardiac transport team. / Staley, Linda L.; Dobberpuhl, Jeff; Pierce, Christopher N.; Scott, Robert L; Jaroszewski, Dawn E.; Arabia, Francisco A.

In: Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), Vol. 20, No. 2, 06.2010, p. 118-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Staley, LL, Dobberpuhl, J, Pierce, CN, Scott, RL, Jaroszewski, DE & Arabia, FA 2010, 'Bridge to decision: SWAT team approach used by Mayo Clinic Arizona's cardiac transport team.', Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 118-124.
Staley, Linda L. ; Dobberpuhl, Jeff ; Pierce, Christopher N. ; Scott, Robert L ; Jaroszewski, Dawn E. ; Arabia, Francisco A. / Bridge to decision : SWAT team approach used by Mayo Clinic Arizona's cardiac transport team. In: Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.). 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 118-124.
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