Brain amyloidosis ascertainment from cognitive, imaging, and peripheral blood protein measures

Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The goal of this study was to identify a clinical biomarker signature of brain amyloidosis in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1 (ADNI1) mild cognitive impairment (MCI) cohort. Methods: We developed a multimodal biomarker classifier for predicting brain amyloidosis using cognitive, imaging, and peripheral blood protein ADNI1 MCI data. We used CSF β;-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) ≤192 pg/mL as proxy measure for Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET standard uptake value ratio ≥1.5. We trained our classifier in the subcohort with CSF Aβ42 but no PiB-PET data and tested its performance in the subcohort with PiB-PET but no CSF Aβ42 data. We also examined the utility of our biomarker signature for predicting disease progression from MCI to Alzheimer dementia. Results: The CSF training classifier selected Mini-Mental State Examination, Trails B, Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed recall, education, APOE genotype, interleukin 6 receptor, clusterin, and ApoE protein, and achieved leave-one-out accuracy of 85% (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.8). The PiB testing classifier achieved an AUC of 0.72, and when classifier selftuning was allowed, AUC = 0.74. The 36-month disease-progression classifier achieved AUC = 0.75 and accuracy = 71%. Conclusions: Automated classifiers based on cognitive and peripheral blood protein variables can identify the presence of brain amyloidosis with a modest level of accuracy. Such methods could have implications for clinical trial design and enrollment in the near future. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that a classification algorithm based on cognitive, imaging, and peripheral blood protein measures identifies patients with brain amyloid on PiB-PET with moderate accuracy (sensitivity 68%, specificity 78%).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)729-737
Number of pages9
JournalNeurology
Volume84
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2015

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Amyloidosis
Blood Proteins
Amyloid
Area Under Curve
Brain
Alzheimer Disease
Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Biomarkers
Neuroimaging
Disease Progression
Clusterin
Interleukin-6 Receptors
Verbal Learning
Proxy
Apolipoproteins E
Genotype
2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole
Clinical Trials
Education
Sensitivity and Specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Brain amyloidosis ascertainment from cognitive, imaging, and peripheral blood protein measures. / Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

In: Neurology, Vol. 84, No. 7, 17.02.2015, p. 729-737.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. / Brain amyloidosis ascertainment from cognitive, imaging, and peripheral blood protein measures. In: Neurology. 2015 ; Vol. 84, No. 7. pp. 729-737.
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abstract = "Background: The goal of this study was to identify a clinical biomarker signature of brain amyloidosis in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1 (ADNI1) mild cognitive impairment (MCI) cohort. Methods: We developed a multimodal biomarker classifier for predicting brain amyloidosis using cognitive, imaging, and peripheral blood protein ADNI1 MCI data. We used CSF β;-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) ≤192 pg/mL as proxy measure for Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET standard uptake value ratio ≥1.5. We trained our classifier in the subcohort with CSF Aβ42 but no PiB-PET data and tested its performance in the subcohort with PiB-PET but no CSF Aβ42 data. We also examined the utility of our biomarker signature for predicting disease progression from MCI to Alzheimer dementia. Results: The CSF training classifier selected Mini-Mental State Examination, Trails B, Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed recall, education, APOE genotype, interleukin 6 receptor, clusterin, and ApoE protein, and achieved leave-one-out accuracy of 85{\%} (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.8). The PiB testing classifier achieved an AUC of 0.72, and when classifier selftuning was allowed, AUC = 0.74. The 36-month disease-progression classifier achieved AUC = 0.75 and accuracy = 71{\%}. Conclusions: Automated classifiers based on cognitive and peripheral blood protein variables can identify the presence of brain amyloidosis with a modest level of accuracy. Such methods could have implications for clinical trial design and enrollment in the near future. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that a classification algorithm based on cognitive, imaging, and peripheral blood protein measures identifies patients with brain amyloid on PiB-PET with moderate accuracy (sensitivity 68{\%}, specificity 78{\%}).",
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AU - Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

AU - Apostolova, Liana G.

AU - Hwang, Kristy S.

AU - Avila, David

AU - Elashoff, David

AU - Kohannim, Omid

AU - Teng, Edmond

AU - Sokolow, Sophie

AU - Jack, Clifford R Jr.

AU - Jagust, William J.

AU - Shaw, Leslie

AU - Trojanowski, John Q.

AU - Weiner, Michael W.

AU - Thompson, Paul M.

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N2 - Background: The goal of this study was to identify a clinical biomarker signature of brain amyloidosis in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1 (ADNI1) mild cognitive impairment (MCI) cohort. Methods: We developed a multimodal biomarker classifier for predicting brain amyloidosis using cognitive, imaging, and peripheral blood protein ADNI1 MCI data. We used CSF β;-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) ≤192 pg/mL as proxy measure for Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET standard uptake value ratio ≥1.5. We trained our classifier in the subcohort with CSF Aβ42 but no PiB-PET data and tested its performance in the subcohort with PiB-PET but no CSF Aβ42 data. We also examined the utility of our biomarker signature for predicting disease progression from MCI to Alzheimer dementia. Results: The CSF training classifier selected Mini-Mental State Examination, Trails B, Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed recall, education, APOE genotype, interleukin 6 receptor, clusterin, and ApoE protein, and achieved leave-one-out accuracy of 85% (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.8). The PiB testing classifier achieved an AUC of 0.72, and when classifier selftuning was allowed, AUC = 0.74. The 36-month disease-progression classifier achieved AUC = 0.75 and accuracy = 71%. Conclusions: Automated classifiers based on cognitive and peripheral blood protein variables can identify the presence of brain amyloidosis with a modest level of accuracy. Such methods could have implications for clinical trial design and enrollment in the near future. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that a classification algorithm based on cognitive, imaging, and peripheral blood protein measures identifies patients with brain amyloid on PiB-PET with moderate accuracy (sensitivity 68%, specificity 78%).

AB - Background: The goal of this study was to identify a clinical biomarker signature of brain amyloidosis in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1 (ADNI1) mild cognitive impairment (MCI) cohort. Methods: We developed a multimodal biomarker classifier for predicting brain amyloidosis using cognitive, imaging, and peripheral blood protein ADNI1 MCI data. We used CSF β;-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) ≤192 pg/mL as proxy measure for Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET standard uptake value ratio ≥1.5. We trained our classifier in the subcohort with CSF Aβ42 but no PiB-PET data and tested its performance in the subcohort with PiB-PET but no CSF Aβ42 data. We also examined the utility of our biomarker signature for predicting disease progression from MCI to Alzheimer dementia. Results: The CSF training classifier selected Mini-Mental State Examination, Trails B, Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed recall, education, APOE genotype, interleukin 6 receptor, clusterin, and ApoE protein, and achieved leave-one-out accuracy of 85% (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.8). The PiB testing classifier achieved an AUC of 0.72, and when classifier selftuning was allowed, AUC = 0.74. The 36-month disease-progression classifier achieved AUC = 0.75 and accuracy = 71%. Conclusions: Automated classifiers based on cognitive and peripheral blood protein variables can identify the presence of brain amyloidosis with a modest level of accuracy. Such methods could have implications for clinical trial design and enrollment in the near future. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that a classification algorithm based on cognitive, imaging, and peripheral blood protein measures identifies patients with brain amyloid on PiB-PET with moderate accuracy (sensitivity 68%, specificity 78%).

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