Bone morphogenetic protein gene therapy

Tord D. Alden, Peter Varady, David F Kallmes, John A. Jane, Gregory A. Helm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Design. A retrospective analysis of previous BMP gene therapy and general gene therapy publications. Objective. To present the potential role of BMP gene therapy for the induction of osteogenesis and spinal fusion. Summary of Background Data. A variety of viral and non-viral techniques have been utilized to insert foreign transgenes into cells, both in vivo and in vitro. These techniques are now being used to transduce cells with a BMP gene to express significant amounts of BMP. This secreted BMP can subsequently stimulate osteogenesis in a variety of locations, including in the paraspinal regions. Methods. A retrospective analysis of the literature. Results. Direct and ex vivo BMP gene therapy has been shown to successfully promote bone healing and regeneration in a variety of animal models. Long-term and regulated transgene expression are clear advantages of BMP gene delivery, compared to direct BMP application. To date, BMP gene delivery with adenoviral vectors have been the most effective approach for stimulating bone induction in vivo. Conclusions. Although BMP gene therapy techniques have significant potential for the treatment of spine pathology, further preclinical and clinical research and development are required before this technology will have direct clinical applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSpine
Volume27
Issue number16 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Aug 15 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bone Morphogenetic Proteins
Genetic Therapy
Transgenes
Osteogenesis
Genes
Spinal Fusion
Bone Regeneration
Publications
Spine
Animal Models
Pathology
Technology
Bone and Bones
Research

Keywords

  • Adenovirus
  • BMPs
  • Gene therapy
  • Osteogenesis
  • Spinal fusion
  • Stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Alden, T. D., Varady, P., Kallmes, D. F., Jane, J. A., & Helm, G. A. (2002). Bone morphogenetic protein gene therapy. Spine, 27(16 SUPPL.).

Bone morphogenetic protein gene therapy. / Alden, Tord D.; Varady, Peter; Kallmes, David F; Jane, John A.; Helm, Gregory A.

In: Spine, Vol. 27, No. 16 SUPPL., 15.08.2002.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alden, TD, Varady, P, Kallmes, DF, Jane, JA & Helm, GA 2002, 'Bone morphogenetic protein gene therapy', Spine, vol. 27, no. 16 SUPPL..
Alden TD, Varady P, Kallmes DF, Jane JA, Helm GA. Bone morphogenetic protein gene therapy. Spine. 2002 Aug 15;27(16 SUPPL.).
Alden, Tord D. ; Varady, Peter ; Kallmes, David F ; Jane, John A. ; Helm, Gregory A. / Bone morphogenetic protein gene therapy. In: Spine. 2002 ; Vol. 27, No. 16 SUPPL.
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