Bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) In Combination With Oxaliplatin Is Safe and Well Tolerated in Patients Who Experienced Coronary Vasospasm With Infusional 5-FU or Capecitabine

Sakti Chakrabarti, Jaskanwal Sara, Ronstan Lobo, Rachel Eiring, Heidi Finnes, Jessica Mitchell, Mindy Hartgers, Akiko Okano, Thorvardur R Halfdanarson, Axel F Grothey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Coronary vasospasm associated with fluoropyrimidine (FP)-based chemotherapy is a potentially serious complication and reported to occur more often with infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or capecitabine than with bolus 5-FU. Given the additional benefit of oxaliplatin over FP alone in the management of colorectal cancer, retaining oxaliplatin in the treatment regimen is desirable, but the safety of combining bolus 5-FU with oxaliplatin in patients with FP-induced vasospasm is not well established. We performed a retrospective review to explore the safety of substituting FLOX (bolus 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) for FOLFOX (infusional 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) and CAPOX (capecitabine, oxaliplatin) in patients who had FP-induced coronary vasospasm. Patients and Methods: The pharmacy database of Mayo Clinic was queried to identify patients who developed coronary vasospasm associated with FOLFOX or CAPOX between January 2011 and January 2018 and were subsequently treated with FLOX. Detailed information was obtained on these patients by retrospective electronic chart review. Results: A total of 10 patients (median age, 56.5 years; range, 36-77 years) were identified, 9 with FOLFOX and 1 with CAPOX. Among the patients treated with FOLFOX, 8 patients had chest pain as the presenting complaint that had started within 48 hours of beginning of the 5-FU infusion. In 9 of 10 patients, coronary vasospasm occurred with the first cycle of therapy. All patients made full recovery after discontinuation of infusional 5-FU or capecitabine. All patients subsequently received FLOX with 7 median bolus 5-FU doses (range, 2-22 doses) and 7 median oxaliplatin doses (range, 2-12 doses) at 7 days to 18 months after the event, with 7 patients treated within 4 weeks of the event. FLOX did not cause any cardiovascular adverse events in any of the 10 patients. Conclusion: Bolus 5-FU in combination with oxaliplatin is safe in patients who have experienced coronary vasospasm with infusional 5-FU or capecitabine. Coronary vasospasm with capecitabine or infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a potentially serious complication. We performed a retrospective review to explore the safety of substituting FLOX (bolus 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) for capecitabine or infusional 5-FU–based regimens in patients who had coronary vasospasm. FLOX is safe in patients who experienced coronary vasospasm with infusional 5-FU or capecitabine

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Colorectal Cancer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

oxaliplatin
Coronary Vasospasm
Fluorouracil
Leucovorin
Capecitabine
Safety

Keywords

  • FLOX
  • Gastrointestinal oncology
  • Medical oncology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) In Combination With Oxaliplatin Is Safe and Well Tolerated in Patients Who Experienced Coronary Vasospasm With Infusional 5-FU or Capecitabine. / Chakrabarti, Sakti; Sara, Jaskanwal; Lobo, Ronstan; Eiring, Rachel; Finnes, Heidi; Mitchell, Jessica; Hartgers, Mindy; Okano, Akiko; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; Grothey, Axel F.

In: Clinical Colorectal Cancer, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chakrabarti, Sakti ; Sara, Jaskanwal ; Lobo, Ronstan ; Eiring, Rachel ; Finnes, Heidi ; Mitchell, Jessica ; Hartgers, Mindy ; Okano, Akiko ; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R ; Grothey, Axel F. / Bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) In Combination With Oxaliplatin Is Safe and Well Tolerated in Patients Who Experienced Coronary Vasospasm With Infusional 5-FU or Capecitabine. In: Clinical Colorectal Cancer. 2018.
@article{07bc124f54a345e5881f57d035023d3d,
title = "Bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) In Combination With Oxaliplatin Is Safe and Well Tolerated in Patients Who Experienced Coronary Vasospasm With Infusional 5-FU or Capecitabine",
abstract = "Introduction: Coronary vasospasm associated with fluoropyrimidine (FP)-based chemotherapy is a potentially serious complication and reported to occur more often with infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or capecitabine than with bolus 5-FU. Given the additional benefit of oxaliplatin over FP alone in the management of colorectal cancer, retaining oxaliplatin in the treatment regimen is desirable, but the safety of combining bolus 5-FU with oxaliplatin in patients with FP-induced vasospasm is not well established. We performed a retrospective review to explore the safety of substituting FLOX (bolus 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) for FOLFOX (infusional 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) and CAPOX (capecitabine, oxaliplatin) in patients who had FP-induced coronary vasospasm. Patients and Methods: The pharmacy database of Mayo Clinic was queried to identify patients who developed coronary vasospasm associated with FOLFOX or CAPOX between January 2011 and January 2018 and were subsequently treated with FLOX. Detailed information was obtained on these patients by retrospective electronic chart review. Results: A total of 10 patients (median age, 56.5 years; range, 36-77 years) were identified, 9 with FOLFOX and 1 with CAPOX. Among the patients treated with FOLFOX, 8 patients had chest pain as the presenting complaint that had started within 48 hours of beginning of the 5-FU infusion. In 9 of 10 patients, coronary vasospasm occurred with the first cycle of therapy. All patients made full recovery after discontinuation of infusional 5-FU or capecitabine. All patients subsequently received FLOX with 7 median bolus 5-FU doses (range, 2-22 doses) and 7 median oxaliplatin doses (range, 2-12 doses) at 7 days to 18 months after the event, with 7 patients treated within 4 weeks of the event. FLOX did not cause any cardiovascular adverse events in any of the 10 patients. Conclusion: Bolus 5-FU in combination with oxaliplatin is safe in patients who have experienced coronary vasospasm with infusional 5-FU or capecitabine. Coronary vasospasm with capecitabine or infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a potentially serious complication. We performed a retrospective review to explore the safety of substituting FLOX (bolus 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) for capecitabine or infusional 5-FU–based regimens in patients who had coronary vasospasm. FLOX is safe in patients who experienced coronary vasospasm with infusional 5-FU or capecitabine",
keywords = "FLOX, Gastrointestinal oncology, Medical oncology",
author = "Sakti Chakrabarti and Jaskanwal Sara and Ronstan Lobo and Rachel Eiring and Heidi Finnes and Jessica Mitchell and Mindy Hartgers and Akiko Okano and Halfdanarson, {Thorvardur R} and Grothey, {Axel F}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.clcc.2018.09.006",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Clinical Colorectal Cancer",
issn = "1533-0028",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) In Combination With Oxaliplatin Is Safe and Well Tolerated in Patients Who Experienced Coronary Vasospasm With Infusional 5-FU or Capecitabine

AU - Chakrabarti, Sakti

AU - Sara, Jaskanwal

AU - Lobo, Ronstan

AU - Eiring, Rachel

AU - Finnes, Heidi

AU - Mitchell, Jessica

AU - Hartgers, Mindy

AU - Okano, Akiko

AU - Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R

AU - Grothey, Axel F

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Introduction: Coronary vasospasm associated with fluoropyrimidine (FP)-based chemotherapy is a potentially serious complication and reported to occur more often with infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or capecitabine than with bolus 5-FU. Given the additional benefit of oxaliplatin over FP alone in the management of colorectal cancer, retaining oxaliplatin in the treatment regimen is desirable, but the safety of combining bolus 5-FU with oxaliplatin in patients with FP-induced vasospasm is not well established. We performed a retrospective review to explore the safety of substituting FLOX (bolus 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) for FOLFOX (infusional 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) and CAPOX (capecitabine, oxaliplatin) in patients who had FP-induced coronary vasospasm. Patients and Methods: The pharmacy database of Mayo Clinic was queried to identify patients who developed coronary vasospasm associated with FOLFOX or CAPOX between January 2011 and January 2018 and were subsequently treated with FLOX. Detailed information was obtained on these patients by retrospective electronic chart review. Results: A total of 10 patients (median age, 56.5 years; range, 36-77 years) were identified, 9 with FOLFOX and 1 with CAPOX. Among the patients treated with FOLFOX, 8 patients had chest pain as the presenting complaint that had started within 48 hours of beginning of the 5-FU infusion. In 9 of 10 patients, coronary vasospasm occurred with the first cycle of therapy. All patients made full recovery after discontinuation of infusional 5-FU or capecitabine. All patients subsequently received FLOX with 7 median bolus 5-FU doses (range, 2-22 doses) and 7 median oxaliplatin doses (range, 2-12 doses) at 7 days to 18 months after the event, with 7 patients treated within 4 weeks of the event. FLOX did not cause any cardiovascular adverse events in any of the 10 patients. Conclusion: Bolus 5-FU in combination with oxaliplatin is safe in patients who have experienced coronary vasospasm with infusional 5-FU or capecitabine. Coronary vasospasm with capecitabine or infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a potentially serious complication. We performed a retrospective review to explore the safety of substituting FLOX (bolus 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) for capecitabine or infusional 5-FU–based regimens in patients who had coronary vasospasm. FLOX is safe in patients who experienced coronary vasospasm with infusional 5-FU or capecitabine

AB - Introduction: Coronary vasospasm associated with fluoropyrimidine (FP)-based chemotherapy is a potentially serious complication and reported to occur more often with infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or capecitabine than with bolus 5-FU. Given the additional benefit of oxaliplatin over FP alone in the management of colorectal cancer, retaining oxaliplatin in the treatment regimen is desirable, but the safety of combining bolus 5-FU with oxaliplatin in patients with FP-induced vasospasm is not well established. We performed a retrospective review to explore the safety of substituting FLOX (bolus 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) for FOLFOX (infusional 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) and CAPOX (capecitabine, oxaliplatin) in patients who had FP-induced coronary vasospasm. Patients and Methods: The pharmacy database of Mayo Clinic was queried to identify patients who developed coronary vasospasm associated with FOLFOX or CAPOX between January 2011 and January 2018 and were subsequently treated with FLOX. Detailed information was obtained on these patients by retrospective electronic chart review. Results: A total of 10 patients (median age, 56.5 years; range, 36-77 years) were identified, 9 with FOLFOX and 1 with CAPOX. Among the patients treated with FOLFOX, 8 patients had chest pain as the presenting complaint that had started within 48 hours of beginning of the 5-FU infusion. In 9 of 10 patients, coronary vasospasm occurred with the first cycle of therapy. All patients made full recovery after discontinuation of infusional 5-FU or capecitabine. All patients subsequently received FLOX with 7 median bolus 5-FU doses (range, 2-22 doses) and 7 median oxaliplatin doses (range, 2-12 doses) at 7 days to 18 months after the event, with 7 patients treated within 4 weeks of the event. FLOX did not cause any cardiovascular adverse events in any of the 10 patients. Conclusion: Bolus 5-FU in combination with oxaliplatin is safe in patients who have experienced coronary vasospasm with infusional 5-FU or capecitabine. Coronary vasospasm with capecitabine or infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a potentially serious complication. We performed a retrospective review to explore the safety of substituting FLOX (bolus 5-FU, oxaliplatin, leucovorin) for capecitabine or infusional 5-FU–based regimens in patients who had coronary vasospasm. FLOX is safe in patients who experienced coronary vasospasm with infusional 5-FU or capecitabine

KW - FLOX

KW - Gastrointestinal oncology

KW - Medical oncology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055893586&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85055893586&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.clcc.2018.09.006

DO - 10.1016/j.clcc.2018.09.006

M3 - Article

JO - Clinical Colorectal Cancer

JF - Clinical Colorectal Cancer

SN - 1533-0028

ER -