Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network Study 1102 heralds a new era in hematopoietic cell transplantation in high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes: Challenges and opportunities in implementation

Erica D. Warlick, Celalettin Ustun, Astrid Andreescu, Anthony F. Bonagura, Andrew Brunner, Abhinav B. Chandra, James M. Foran, Mark B. Juckett, Tamila L. Kindwall-Keller, Virginia M. Klimek, Daniel F. Pease, David P. Steensma, Bryce M. Waldman, Mary M. Horowitz, Linda J. Burns, Nandita Khera

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Abstract

Lay Summary: People who have advanced myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) may live longer if they get a bone marrow transplant (BMT) instead of other therapies. However, only 15% of people with MDS actually get BMT. Experts say community physicians and transplant physicians should team up with insurance companies and patient advocacy groups to 1) spread this news about lifesaving advances in BMT, 2) ensure that everyone can afford health care, 3) provide emotional support for patients and families, 4) help patients and families get transportation and housing if they need to travel for transplant, and 5) improve care for people of under-represented racial and ethnic backgrounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4339-4347
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume127
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2021

Keywords

  • allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation
  • expanded access
  • MDS
  • myelodysplastic syndromes
  • reduce intensity conditioning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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