Blenderized Tube Feedings for Adult Patients on Home Enteral Nutrition: A Pilot Study

Ryan T Hurt, Lisa M. Epp, Wanda M. Duellman, Adele K. Pattinson, Lisa Lammert, Margaret R. Baker, Lisa D. Miller, Aravind Reddy Kuchkuntla, Manpreet S. Mundi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite surveys indicating a high prevalence of blenderized tube feeding (BTF) as an alternative to commercial enteral nutrition (EN), there remains a paucity of data regarding use in clinical practice. The objective of the present open-label pilot study was to assess the safety and effectiveness of BTF in adult patients being given home enteral nutrition (HEN). Design: This is an open-label pilot study, in which all participants who had been on traditional EN formulas were changed to BTF for 6 weeks. Setting/Location: The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Participants: Twenty individuals gave their consent to participate in the study, with nine completing the 6-week BTF protocol. Outcome measures: Weight was measured at baseline and at 6 weeks of BTF use. Participants completed a survey regarding the frequency of BTF use and adverse effects, at baseline and then weekly for 6 weeks. Results: Nine participants with a mean age of 60.6 ± 7.8 years completed the 6-week protocol. BTF use increased from 4.85 ± 2.44 to 6.45 ± 0.82 days per week from week 1 to week 6. The percentage of participants consuming >50% of their calorie intake from BTF increased from 23.1% (3 of 13 participants) at week 1 to 44.4% (4 of 9 participants) at week 6. Six of nine participants experienced weight gain, weight was maintained by one participant, and two participants lost weight (intentionally in one and due to an intolerance of commercial formula in the other). Conclusions: BTF was found to be safe and effective in promoting weight gain in adult participants who required HEN for at least 6 weeks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-416
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Enteral Nutrition
Weights and Measures
Weight Gain
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • blenderized tube feedings
  • enteral nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Blenderized Tube Feedings for Adult Patients on Home Enteral Nutrition : A Pilot Study. / Hurt, Ryan T; Epp, Lisa M.; Duellman, Wanda M.; Pattinson, Adele K.; Lammert, Lisa; Baker, Margaret R.; Miller, Lisa D.; Kuchkuntla, Aravind Reddy; Mundi, Manpreet S.

In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.04.2019, p. 413-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hurt, RT, Epp, LM, Duellman, WM, Pattinson, AK, Lammert, L, Baker, MR, Miller, LD, Kuchkuntla, AR & Mundi, MS 2019, 'Blenderized Tube Feedings for Adult Patients on Home Enteral Nutrition: A Pilot Study', Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 413-416. https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2018.0227
Hurt, Ryan T ; Epp, Lisa M. ; Duellman, Wanda M. ; Pattinson, Adele K. ; Lammert, Lisa ; Baker, Margaret R. ; Miller, Lisa D. ; Kuchkuntla, Aravind Reddy ; Mundi, Manpreet S. / Blenderized Tube Feedings for Adult Patients on Home Enteral Nutrition : A Pilot Study. In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 413-416.
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