Biochemical differentiation of aggregating cell cultures of different fetal rat brain regions

Paul Honegger, Elliott Richelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rotation-mediated aggregating cell cultures of mechanically dissociated fetal rat brains divided into three (telencephalon, mesencephalon-diencephalon and rhombencephalon), or two (telencephalon and mesencephalon-diencephalon plus rhombencephalon) parts were examined for their biochemical differentiation by measuring the specific activities of choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase, glutamic acid decarboxylase, tyrosine 3-monooxygenase, aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, catechol methyltransferase and monoamine oxidase. The results showed that such parts yielded cultures that were relatively enriched for acetylcholine-synthesizing (telencephalon) or catecholamine-synthesizing (mesencephalon-diencephalon and mesencephalon-diencephalon plus rhombencephalon) enzymes. For cultures which were derived from two brain divisions, the sum of the total activity for each enzyme in the parts after 30 days equalled that in whole brain cultures derived from the same group of embryos, suggesting that development of these enzymes was unaffected by division of the brain in two. In experiments to determine the effects of culture conditions on this development, chronic administration of certain drugs was found to selectively influence the specific activity of certain neurotransmitter metabolizing enzymes. Thus, in cultures of whole brain, ascorbic acid (0.2 mM) decreased tyrosine 3-monooxygenase and aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase while other enzymes were slightly increased; and in cultures of telencephalon and mesencephalon-diencephalon plus rhombencephalon, N6, O2′-dibutyryladenosine 3′,5′-cyclic phosphate (0.2 mM) decreased the specific activities of choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase, glutamic acid decarboxylase and monoamine oxidase. These results demonstrate the feasibility of growing these cultures for pharmacological studies in developmental neurobiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-339
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Research
Volume133
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 16 1977

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Diencephalon
Mesencephalon
Telencephalon
Rhombencephalon
Cell Culture Techniques
Aromatic-L-Amino-Acid Decarboxylases
Brain
Enzymes
Glutamate Decarboxylase
Choline O-Acetyltransferase
Monoamine Oxidase
Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase
Acetylcholinesterase
Catechol Oxidase
Catechol O-Methyltransferase
Neurobiology
Ascorbic Acid
Acetylcholine
Catecholamines
Embryonic Development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Biochemical differentiation of aggregating cell cultures of different fetal rat brain regions. / Honegger, Paul; Richelson, Elliott.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 133, No. 2, 16.09.1977, p. 329-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Honegger, Paul ; Richelson, Elliott. / Biochemical differentiation of aggregating cell cultures of different fetal rat brain regions. In: Brain Research. 1977 ; Vol. 133, No. 2. pp. 329-339.
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