Biliary tract physiology

Richard T. Prall, Nicholas F La Russo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cholangiocytes, the cells lining the bile ducts, are now recognized as important contributors to and modulators of bile formation. During the last few years, remarkable insights have been made into the mechanisms of fluid, electrolyte, and solute transport by biliary epithelia, as well as increasing knowledge of the complex endocrine, paracrine, and neurologic factors regulating bile formation. Advances in the past year include an increased understanding of the interaction between bile acids and cholangiocytes in the regulation of bile formation in normal and cholestatic states and greater insight into the pathogenic mechanisms of biliary diseases. References to recent comprehensive reviews of specific areas of biliary physiology are provided, and new experimental models are also described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)432-436
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Gastroenterology
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Biliary Tract
Bile
Bile Ducts
Bile Acids and Salts
Nervous System
Electrolytes
Theoretical Models
Epithelium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Biliary tract physiology. / Prall, Richard T.; La Russo, Nicholas F.

In: Current Opinion in Gastroenterology, Vol. 16, No. 5, 2000, p. 432-436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prall, Richard T. ; La Russo, Nicholas F. / Biliary tract physiology. In: Current Opinion in Gastroenterology. 2000 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 432-436.
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