Bilateral multicanal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo coexisting with a vestibular schwannoma: Case report

Selmin Karatayli-Ozgursoy, Greta C. Stamper, Larry B Lundy, David A Zapala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We describe a rarely encountered case of coexisting bilateral multicanal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and vestibular schwannoma in a 56-year-old woman. The patient had presented with a 10-year history of dizziness and imbalance, and her vestibular findings were perplexing. We decided on a working diagnosis of BPPV and began treatment. After several months of canalith repositioning maneuvers had failed to resolve her symptoms, we obtained magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed the presence of the vestibular schwannoma. This case serves as a reminder of the importance of differentiating between central and peripheral vestibular disorders, as well as central and anterior canal BPPV-induced down-beating nystagmus in order to establish the correct diagnosis and initiate appropriate treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEar, Nose and Throat Journal
Volume90
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2011

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Acoustic Neuroma
Dizziness
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Therapeutics
Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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Bilateral multicanal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo coexisting with a vestibular schwannoma : Case report. / Karatayli-Ozgursoy, Selmin; Stamper, Greta C.; Lundy, Larry B; Zapala, David A.

In: Ear, Nose and Throat Journal, Vol. 90, No. 1, 01.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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