Beta-2 adrenergic receptor genotype influences power output in healthy subjects

Eli F. Kelley, Bruce David Johnson, Eric M. Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ADRB2 genotypes on muscle function (absolute power and relative power) in healthy subjects. We performed genotyping of the ADRB2 (amino acid 1) and high-intensity, steady-state exercise on 77 healthy subjects (AA = 18, AG = 25, GG = 34). There were no differences between genotype groups in age, height, weight, or body mass index (BMI) (age = 28.9 ± 5.7 years, 27.9 ± 5.7 years, 29.2 ± 5.9 years, height = 170.7 ± 8.± cm, 174.9 ± 8.7 cm, 173.4 ± 9.6 cm, weight = 68.5 ± 13.0 kg, 75.0 ± 12.9 kg, 74.4 ± 12.9 kg, and BMI = 23.4 ± 3.9, 24.4 ± 2.9, 24.7 ± 3.4, for AA, AG, and GG, respectively). The genotype groups differed significantly in watts, and watts/V- O2 with heavy exercise (watts = 186.3 ± 54 ± 237.8 ± 54.4, 219.4 ± 79.5, watts/V- O2 = 0.08 ± 0.006, 0.09 ± 0.005, 0.08 ± 0.006). There was a trend toward significance (p = 0.058) for W$kg21 (2.7 ± 0.4, 3.2 ± 0.5, 2.9 ± 0.8, for AA, AG, and GG, respectively). These data suggest that genetic variation of the ADRB2 may influence relative strength in healthy subjects and may become an important genetic determinant of muscular strength and functional capacity in patients with diseases that result in a loss of muscle strength.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2053-2059
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume31
Issue number8
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • ADRB2 polymorphism
  • Beta- 2 genotype
  • Beta-2 receptor
  • Exercise
  • Strength

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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