Beliefs and experiences regarding smoking cessation among American Indians

Diana Burgess, Steven S. Fu, Anne M. Joseph, Dorothy K. Hatsukami, Jody Solomon, Michelle van Ryn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A dearth of information exists about American Indians' views about smoking and cessation. We present results from six focus groups conducted among current and former smokers from American Indian communities in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area, as part of a larger qualitative study. Findings indicate that, although smoking is common and acceptable among this population, many would like to quit. The majority of focus group participants attempted cessation without the aid of counseling and pharmacotherapy. Many held negative attitudes toward pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation, including worries about side effects, skepticism about effectiveness, and dislike of medications in general. Negative attitudes were grounded partly in a lack of trust in conventional medicine and, for some, were related to historic and continuing racism. Participants also reported a lack of information about tobacco dependence treatment from health care providers, including information about the functional benefits of such treatment. Nonetheless, participants thought smokers might try pharmacotherapy if it was made more accessible in their community and if community members could offer word-of-mouth testimonials regarding its effectiveness. Results point to the need for community- and peer-based smoking cessation treatment in the American Indian community, including accurate information from trusted sources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume9
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007
Externally publishedYes

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North American Indians
Smoking Cessation
Focus Groups
Drug Therapy
Racism
Tobacco Use Disorder
Withholding Treatment
Health Personnel
Counseling
Smoking
Medicine
Therapeutics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Burgess, D., Fu, S. S., Joseph, A. M., Hatsukami, D. K., Solomon, J., & van Ryn, M. (2007). Beliefs and experiences regarding smoking cessation among American Indians. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 9(SUPPL. 1). https://doi.org/10.1080/14622200601083426

Beliefs and experiences regarding smoking cessation among American Indians. / Burgess, Diana; Fu, Steven S.; Joseph, Anne M.; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Solomon, Jody; van Ryn, Michelle.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 9, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burgess, D, Fu, SS, Joseph, AM, Hatsukami, DK, Solomon, J & van Ryn, M 2007, 'Beliefs and experiences regarding smoking cessation among American Indians', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, vol. 9, no. SUPPL. 1. https://doi.org/10.1080/14622200601083426
Burgess, Diana ; Fu, Steven S. ; Joseph, Anne M. ; Hatsukami, Dorothy K. ; Solomon, Jody ; van Ryn, Michelle. / Beliefs and experiences regarding smoking cessation among American Indians. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2007 ; Vol. 9, No. SUPPL. 1.
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