Beliefs and attitudes about prescribing opioids among healthcare providers seeking continuing medical education

W. Michael Hooten, Barbara K. Bruce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the beliefs and attitudes of healthcare providers about prescribing opioids for chronic pain. Setting: The setting was a continuing medical education conference that was specifically designed to deliver content about chronic pain and prescription opioids to providers without specialty expertise in pain medicine. Participants: Conference attendees with prescribing privileges were eligible to participate, including physicians, physician assistants, and advance practice nurses. Intervention: Study participants completed a questionnaire using an electronic response system. Main outcome measures: Study participants completed a validated questionnaire that u 'as specifically developed to measure the beliefs and attitudes of healthcare providers about prescribing opioids for chronic pain. Results: The questionnaire was completed by 128 healthcare providers. The majority (58 percent) indicated that they were "likely" to prescribe opioids for chronic pain. A significant proportion of respondents had favorable beliefs and attitudes toward improvements in pain (p < 0.001) and quality of life (p < 0.001) attributed to prescribing opioids. However, a significant proportion had negative beliefs and attitudes about medication abuse (p < 0.001) and addiction (p < 0.001). Respondents also indicated that prescribing opioids could significantly increase the complexity of patient care and could unfavorably impact several administrative aspects of clinical practice. Conclusions: The beliefs and attitudes identified in this study highlight important educational gaps that exist among healthcare providers about prescribing opioids. Knowledge of these educational gaps could build the capacity of medical educators to develop targeted educational materials that could improve the opioid prescribing practices of healthcare providers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)417-424
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Opioid Management
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

Fingerprint

Continuing Medical Education
Health Personnel
Opioid Analgesics
Chronic Pain
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physician Assistants
Pain
Prescriptions
Patient Care
Nurses
Quality of Life
Medicine
Surveys and Questionnaires
Physicians

Keywords

  • Attitudes and beliefs
  • Chronic pain
  • Continuing medical education
  • Healthcare providers
  • Prescription opioid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Beliefs and attitudes about prescribing opioids among healthcare providers seeking continuing medical education. / Hooten, W. Michael; Bruce, Barbara K.

In: Journal of Opioid Management, Vol. 7, No. 6, 11.2011, p. 417-424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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