Behavioral and cognitive predictors of educational outcomes in pediatric traumatic brain injury

Anne B. Arnett, Robin L. Peterson, Michael W. Kirkwood, H. Gerry Taylor, Terry Stancin, Tanya M. Brown, Shari L. Wade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract Research reveals mixed results regarding the utility of standardized cognitive and academic tests to predict educational outcomes in youth following a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Yet, deficits in everyday school-based outcomes are prevalent after pediatric TBI. The current study used path modeling to test the hypothesis that parent ratings of adolescents' daily behaviors associated with executive functioning (EF) would predict long-term functional educational outcomes following pediatric TBI, even when injury severity and patient demographics were included in the model. Furthermore, we contrasted the predictive strength of the EF behavioral ratings with that of a common measure of verbal memory. A total of 132 adolescents who were hospitalized for moderate to severe TBI were recruited to participate in a randomized clinical intervention trial. EF ratings and verbal memory were measured within 6 months of the injury; functional educational outcomes were measured 12 months later. EF ratings and verbal memory added to injury severity in predicting educational competence post injury but did not predict post-injury initiation of special education. The results demonstrated that measurement of EF behaviors is an important research and clinical tool for prediction of functional outcomes in pediatric TBI. (JINS, 2013, 19, 1-9)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)881-889
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

brain
Pediatrics
rating
Wounds and Injuries
adolescent
Special Education
Adolescent Behavior
Research
special education
Mental Competency
deficit
parents
Randomized Controlled Trials
Demography
Traumatic Brain Injury
Predictors
Education
Rating
school
Verbal Memory

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Brain concussion
  • Keywords Executive function
  • Language
  • Neuropsychology
  • Special education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Arnett, A. B., Peterson, R. L., Kirkwood, M. W., Taylor, H. G., Stancin, T., Brown, T. M., & Wade, S. L. (2013). Behavioral and cognitive predictors of educational outcomes in pediatric traumatic brain injury. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 19(8), 881-889. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1355617713000635

Behavioral and cognitive predictors of educational outcomes in pediatric traumatic brain injury. / Arnett, Anne B.; Peterson, Robin L.; Kirkwood, Michael W.; Taylor, H. Gerry; Stancin, Terry; Brown, Tanya M.; Wade, Shari L.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 19, No. 8, 09.2013, p. 881-889.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arnett, Anne B. ; Peterson, Robin L. ; Kirkwood, Michael W. ; Taylor, H. Gerry ; Stancin, Terry ; Brown, Tanya M. ; Wade, Shari L. / Behavioral and cognitive predictors of educational outcomes in pediatric traumatic brain injury. In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. 2013 ; Vol. 19, No. 8. pp. 881-889.
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