Baseline Mammography: What Is It and Why Is It Important? A Cross-Sectional Survey of Women Undergoing Screening Mammography

Robert K. Horsley, Juliana M. Kling, Suneela Vegunta, Roxanne Lorans, H'hamed Temkit, Bhavika Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Studies have shown that having a baseline mammogram, the first screening mammogram, available for comparison at the time of interpreting a subsequent mammogram significantly decreases the potential of a false-positive examination. Our aim was to evaluate knowledge of and perception about the significance of baseline mammograms in those women undergoing screening mammography. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional prospective survey study was conducted in women without a history of breast cancer presenting for their screening mammogram. Respondents were surveyed anonymously between March and April 2017. The questionnaire was developed by primary care providers and radiologists and pretested for readability and clarity. Results: In all, 401 women (87% white, 93% educated beyond high school) completed surveys in which 77% of women reported having yearly mammograms, 31% reported having a history of an abnormal mammogram, and 45% had not heard the term baseline mammogram. Of those who had heard the term, the most commonly reported source was their primary care provider (31%). Although 74% chose the correct definition of a baseline mammogram, 67% did not think that a baseline mammogram was important for decreasing associated cost, time, and discomfort due to the number of mammograms incorrectly read as abnormal. Conclusion: In a group of educated women who routinely get mammograms, almost one-half had not heard the term baseline mammogram. Furthermore, most women did not think baseline mammography was important for decreasing associated cost, time, and discomfort due to mammograms incorrectly read as abnormal. This study suggests that efforts to improve women's understanding of baseline mammograms and their importance are warranted, with greatest opportunity for health care providers and radiologists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American College of Radiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Mammography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Primary Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Personnel
Prospective Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Baseline mammogram
  • breast cancer screening
  • mammogram
  • preventive care
  • screening mammography
  • women's health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Baseline Mammography : What Is It and Why Is It Important? A Cross-Sectional Survey of Women Undergoing Screening Mammography. / Horsley, Robert K.; Kling, Juliana M.; Vegunta, Suneela; Lorans, Roxanne; Temkit, H'hamed; Patel, Bhavika.

In: Journal of the American College of Radiology, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: Studies have shown that having a baseline mammogram, the first screening mammogram, available for comparison at the time of interpreting a subsequent mammogram significantly decreases the potential of a false-positive examination. Our aim was to evaluate knowledge of and perception about the significance of baseline mammograms in those women undergoing screening mammography. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional prospective survey study was conducted in women without a history of breast cancer presenting for their screening mammogram. Respondents were surveyed anonymously between March and April 2017. The questionnaire was developed by primary care providers and radiologists and pretested for readability and clarity. Results: In all, 401 women (87{\%} white, 93{\%} educated beyond high school) completed surveys in which 77{\%} of women reported having yearly mammograms, 31{\%} reported having a history of an abnormal mammogram, and 45{\%} had not heard the term baseline mammogram. Of those who had heard the term, the most commonly reported source was their primary care provider (31{\%}). Although 74{\%} chose the correct definition of a baseline mammogram, 67{\%} did not think that a baseline mammogram was important for decreasing associated cost, time, and discomfort due to the number of mammograms incorrectly read as abnormal. Conclusion: In a group of educated women who routinely get mammograms, almost one-half had not heard the term baseline mammogram. Furthermore, most women did not think baseline mammography was important for decreasing associated cost, time, and discomfort due to mammograms incorrectly read as abnormal. This study suggests that efforts to improve women's understanding of baseline mammograms and their importance are warranted, with greatest opportunity for health care providers and radiologists.",
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