B-Lymphocytes in plaque and adventitia of coronary arteries in two patients with rheumatoid arthritis and coronary atherosclerosis

Preliminary observations

Marie Christine Aubry, Darren L. Riehle, William D. Edwards, Hilal D Maradit Kremers, Veronique Lee Roger, Thomas J. Sebo, Sherine E. Gabriel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To describe the subtypes of lymphocytes in coronary arteries of two patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and methods The Mayo Clinic database was searched for patients with RA and CAD who underwent an autopsy in 2001. Medical records were reviewed, and coronary arteries were examined microscopically. The percentage of B- and T-lymphocytes was determined using histomorphometry on representative sections stained with CD20 and CD3 antibodies, respectively. Results Two men were diagnosed with RA at ages 52 and 70 years and died at ages 60 and 82 years. One sustained an acute myocardial infarction 2 years prior to the diagnosis of RA and had stable CAD until an arrhythmic death. The other developed congestive heart failure secondary to ischemic heart disease 5 years after RA was diagnosed. Both patients had severe three-vessel CAD with both stable fibrocalcific plaques and acute lesions. B- and T-lymphocytes were identified in the plaque and adventitia of all coronary arteries. The mean percentage of B-lymphocytes was 37% to 52% in the plaque and 78% to 85% in the adventitia, while that of T-lymphocytes was 38% to 51% and 28%, for plaque and adventitia, respectively. Conclusions In typical CAD, lymphocytic infiltrates are almost exclusively T-cells. In contrast, the two patients with RA and CAD showed prominent infiltrates of B-lymphocytes within plaques and adventitia. Thus, the leukocytic response in atherosclerotic plaques may be altered in patients with autoimmune disorders. This warrants further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-236
Number of pages4
JournalCardiovascular Pathology
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004

Fingerprint

Adventitia
Coronary Artery Disease
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Coronary Vessels
B-Lymphocytes
T-Lymphocytes
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Medical Records
Myocardial Ischemia
Autopsy
Heart Failure
Myocardial Infarction
Databases
Lymphocytes
Antibodies

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • B-lymphocytes
  • Coronary artery disease
  • T-lymphocytes rheumatoid arthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

B-Lymphocytes in plaque and adventitia of coronary arteries in two patients with rheumatoid arthritis and coronary atherosclerosis : Preliminary observations. / Aubry, Marie Christine; Riehle, Darren L.; Edwards, William D.; Maradit Kremers, Hilal D; Roger, Veronique Lee; Sebo, Thomas J.; Gabriel, Sherine E.

In: Cardiovascular Pathology, Vol. 13, No. 4, 07.2004, p. 233-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives To describe the subtypes of lymphocytes in coronary arteries of two patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and methods The Mayo Clinic database was searched for patients with RA and CAD who underwent an autopsy in 2001. Medical records were reviewed, and coronary arteries were examined microscopically. The percentage of B- and T-lymphocytes was determined using histomorphometry on representative sections stained with CD20 and CD3 antibodies, respectively. Results Two men were diagnosed with RA at ages 52 and 70 years and died at ages 60 and 82 years. One sustained an acute myocardial infarction 2 years prior to the diagnosis of RA and had stable CAD until an arrhythmic death. The other developed congestive heart failure secondary to ischemic heart disease 5 years after RA was diagnosed. Both patients had severe three-vessel CAD with both stable fibrocalcific plaques and acute lesions. B- and T-lymphocytes were identified in the plaque and adventitia of all coronary arteries. The mean percentage of B-lymphocytes was 37{\%} to 52{\%} in the plaque and 78{\%} to 85{\%} in the adventitia, while that of T-lymphocytes was 38{\%} to 51{\%} and 28{\%}, for plaque and adventitia, respectively. Conclusions In typical CAD, lymphocytic infiltrates are almost exclusively T-cells. In contrast, the two patients with RA and CAD showed prominent infiltrates of B-lymphocytes within plaques and adventitia. Thus, the leukocytic response in atherosclerotic plaques may be altered in patients with autoimmune disorders. This warrants further study.",
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N2 - Objectives To describe the subtypes of lymphocytes in coronary arteries of two patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and methods The Mayo Clinic database was searched for patients with RA and CAD who underwent an autopsy in 2001. Medical records were reviewed, and coronary arteries were examined microscopically. The percentage of B- and T-lymphocytes was determined using histomorphometry on representative sections stained with CD20 and CD3 antibodies, respectively. Results Two men were diagnosed with RA at ages 52 and 70 years and died at ages 60 and 82 years. One sustained an acute myocardial infarction 2 years prior to the diagnosis of RA and had stable CAD until an arrhythmic death. The other developed congestive heart failure secondary to ischemic heart disease 5 years after RA was diagnosed. Both patients had severe three-vessel CAD with both stable fibrocalcific plaques and acute lesions. B- and T-lymphocytes were identified in the plaque and adventitia of all coronary arteries. The mean percentage of B-lymphocytes was 37% to 52% in the plaque and 78% to 85% in the adventitia, while that of T-lymphocytes was 38% to 51% and 28%, for plaque and adventitia, respectively. Conclusions In typical CAD, lymphocytic infiltrates are almost exclusively T-cells. In contrast, the two patients with RA and CAD showed prominent infiltrates of B-lymphocytes within plaques and adventitia. Thus, the leukocytic response in atherosclerotic plaques may be altered in patients with autoimmune disorders. This warrants further study.

AB - Objectives To describe the subtypes of lymphocytes in coronary arteries of two patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and methods The Mayo Clinic database was searched for patients with RA and CAD who underwent an autopsy in 2001. Medical records were reviewed, and coronary arteries were examined microscopically. The percentage of B- and T-lymphocytes was determined using histomorphometry on representative sections stained with CD20 and CD3 antibodies, respectively. Results Two men were diagnosed with RA at ages 52 and 70 years and died at ages 60 and 82 years. One sustained an acute myocardial infarction 2 years prior to the diagnosis of RA and had stable CAD until an arrhythmic death. The other developed congestive heart failure secondary to ischemic heart disease 5 years after RA was diagnosed. Both patients had severe three-vessel CAD with both stable fibrocalcific plaques and acute lesions. B- and T-lymphocytes were identified in the plaque and adventitia of all coronary arteries. The mean percentage of B-lymphocytes was 37% to 52% in the plaque and 78% to 85% in the adventitia, while that of T-lymphocytes was 38% to 51% and 28%, for plaque and adventitia, respectively. Conclusions In typical CAD, lymphocytic infiltrates are almost exclusively T-cells. In contrast, the two patients with RA and CAD showed prominent infiltrates of B-lymphocytes within plaques and adventitia. Thus, the leukocytic response in atherosclerotic plaques may be altered in patients with autoimmune disorders. This warrants further study.

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