Automatic segmentation and Co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets: measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility

Robert Wentz, Armando Manduca, Joel Garland Fletcher, Hassan Siddiki, Raymond C. Shields, Terri J Vrtiska, Garrett Spencer, Andrew N. Primak, Jie Zhang, Theresa Nielson, Cynthia H McCollough, Lifeng Yu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To develop robust, novel segmentation and co-registration software to analyze temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets, with an aim to permit automated measurement of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: We perform retrospective gated CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Multiple, temporally overlapping, time-resolved CT angiography datasets are reconstructed over the cardiac cycle, with aortic segmentation performed using a priori anatomic assumptions for the aorta and heart. Visual quality assessment is performed following automatic segmentation with manual editing. Following subsequent centerline generation, centerlines are cross-registered across phases, with internal validation of co-registration performed by examining registration at the regions of greatest diameter change (i.e. when the second derivative is maximal). Results: We have performed gated CT angiography in 60 patients. Automatic seed placement is successful in 79% of datasets, requiring either no editing (70%) or minimal editing (less than 1 minute; 12%). Causes of error include segmentation into adjacent, high-attenuating, non-vascular tissues; small segmentation errors associated with calcified plaque; and segmentation of non-renal, small paralumbar arteries. Internal validation of cross-registration demonstrates appropriate registration in our patient population. In general, we observed that aortic pulsatility can vary along the course of the abdominal aorta. Pulsation can also vary within an aneurysm as well as between aneurysms, but the clinical significance of these findings remain unknown. Conclusions: Visualization of large vessel pulsatility is possible using ECG-gated CT angiography, partial scan reconstruction, automatic segmentation, centerline generation, and co-registration of temporally resolved datasets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume6511
EditionPART 2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
EventMedical Imaging 2007: Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 18 2007Feb 20 2007

Other

OtherMedical Imaging 2007: Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period2/18/072/20/07

Fingerprint

Angiography
Electrocardiography
Seed
Visualization
Tissue
Derivatives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Wentz, R., Manduca, A., Fletcher, J. G., Siddiki, H., Shields, R. C., Vrtiska, T. J., ... Yu, L. (2007). Automatic segmentation and Co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets: measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (PART 2 ed., Vol. 6511). [65111I] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.713759

Automatic segmentation and Co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets : measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility. / Wentz, Robert; Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, Joel Garland; Siddiki, Hassan; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri J; Spencer, Garrett; Primak, Andrew N.; Zhang, Jie; Nielson, Theresa; McCollough, Cynthia H; Yu, Lifeng.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6511 PART 2. ed. 2007. 65111I.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wentz, R, Manduca, A, Fletcher, JG, Siddiki, H, Shields, RC, Vrtiska, TJ, Spencer, G, Primak, AN, Zhang, J, Nielson, T, McCollough, CH & Yu, L 2007, Automatic segmentation and Co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets: measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. PART 2 edn, vol. 6511, 65111I, Medical Imaging 2007: Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images, San Diego, CA, United States, 2/18/07. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.713759
Wentz R, Manduca A, Fletcher JG, Siddiki H, Shields RC, Vrtiska TJ et al. Automatic segmentation and Co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets: measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. PART 2 ed. Vol. 6511. 2007. 65111I https://doi.org/10.1117/12.713759
Wentz, Robert ; Manduca, Armando ; Fletcher, Joel Garland ; Siddiki, Hassan ; Shields, Raymond C. ; Vrtiska, Terri J ; Spencer, Garrett ; Primak, Andrew N. ; Zhang, Jie ; Nielson, Theresa ; McCollough, Cynthia H ; Yu, Lifeng. / Automatic segmentation and Co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets : measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6511 PART 2. ed. 2007.
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abstract = "Purpose: To develop robust, novel segmentation and co-registration software to analyze temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets, with an aim to permit automated measurement of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: We perform retrospective gated CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Multiple, temporally overlapping, time-resolved CT angiography datasets are reconstructed over the cardiac cycle, with aortic segmentation performed using a priori anatomic assumptions for the aorta and heart. Visual quality assessment is performed following automatic segmentation with manual editing. Following subsequent centerline generation, centerlines are cross-registered across phases, with internal validation of co-registration performed by examining registration at the regions of greatest diameter change (i.e. when the second derivative is maximal). Results: We have performed gated CT angiography in 60 patients. Automatic seed placement is successful in 79{\%} of datasets, requiring either no editing (70{\%}) or minimal editing (less than 1 minute; 12{\%}). Causes of error include segmentation into adjacent, high-attenuating, non-vascular tissues; small segmentation errors associated with calcified plaque; and segmentation of non-renal, small paralumbar arteries. Internal validation of cross-registration demonstrates appropriate registration in our patient population. In general, we observed that aortic pulsatility can vary along the course of the abdominal aorta. Pulsation can also vary within an aneurysm as well as between aneurysms, but the clinical significance of these findings remain unknown. Conclusions: Visualization of large vessel pulsatility is possible using ECG-gated CT angiography, partial scan reconstruction, automatic segmentation, centerline generation, and co-registration of temporally resolved datasets.",
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AU - Shields, Raymond C.

AU - Vrtiska, Terri J

AU - Spencer, Garrett

AU - Primak, Andrew N.

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N2 - Purpose: To develop robust, novel segmentation and co-registration software to analyze temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets, with an aim to permit automated measurement of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: We perform retrospective gated CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Multiple, temporally overlapping, time-resolved CT angiography datasets are reconstructed over the cardiac cycle, with aortic segmentation performed using a priori anatomic assumptions for the aorta and heart. Visual quality assessment is performed following automatic segmentation with manual editing. Following subsequent centerline generation, centerlines are cross-registered across phases, with internal validation of co-registration performed by examining registration at the regions of greatest diameter change (i.e. when the second derivative is maximal). Results: We have performed gated CT angiography in 60 patients. Automatic seed placement is successful in 79% of datasets, requiring either no editing (70%) or minimal editing (less than 1 minute; 12%). Causes of error include segmentation into adjacent, high-attenuating, non-vascular tissues; small segmentation errors associated with calcified plaque; and segmentation of non-renal, small paralumbar arteries. Internal validation of cross-registration demonstrates appropriate registration in our patient population. In general, we observed that aortic pulsatility can vary along the course of the abdominal aorta. Pulsation can also vary within an aneurysm as well as between aneurysms, but the clinical significance of these findings remain unknown. Conclusions: Visualization of large vessel pulsatility is possible using ECG-gated CT angiography, partial scan reconstruction, automatic segmentation, centerline generation, and co-registration of temporally resolved datasets.

AB - Purpose: To develop robust, novel segmentation and co-registration software to analyze temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets, with an aim to permit automated measurement of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: We perform retrospective gated CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Multiple, temporally overlapping, time-resolved CT angiography datasets are reconstructed over the cardiac cycle, with aortic segmentation performed using a priori anatomic assumptions for the aorta and heart. Visual quality assessment is performed following automatic segmentation with manual editing. Following subsequent centerline generation, centerlines are cross-registered across phases, with internal validation of co-registration performed by examining registration at the regions of greatest diameter change (i.e. when the second derivative is maximal). Results: We have performed gated CT angiography in 60 patients. Automatic seed placement is successful in 79% of datasets, requiring either no editing (70%) or minimal editing (less than 1 minute; 12%). Causes of error include segmentation into adjacent, high-attenuating, non-vascular tissues; small segmentation errors associated with calcified plaque; and segmentation of non-renal, small paralumbar arteries. Internal validation of cross-registration demonstrates appropriate registration in our patient population. In general, we observed that aortic pulsatility can vary along the course of the abdominal aorta. Pulsation can also vary within an aneurysm as well as between aneurysms, but the clinical significance of these findings remain unknown. Conclusions: Visualization of large vessel pulsatility is possible using ECG-gated CT angiography, partial scan reconstruction, automatic segmentation, centerline generation, and co-registration of temporally resolved datasets.

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